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What is the Staffordshire Hoard?

The Staffordshire Hoard Credit: PA Wire

The Staffordshire Hoard was discovered in a field near the village of Hammerwich, near Lichfield, in Staffordshire, on 5th July 2009.

The Hoard is the largest collection of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork ever found, consisting of more than 4000 items.

It includes:

5,094 kilos of gold

1,442 of silver 3,500 cloisonné garnets.

The artefacts have been dated to the 6th or 7th centuries, placing the origin of the items in the time of the Kingdom of Mercia.

At least one helmet, composed of over 1,500 pieces, is contained in the treasure

For more information visit the Staffordshire Hoard website.

Experts piece together Staffordshire Hoard jigsaw

The Staffordshire Hoard from the sixth and seventh centuries was first discovered buried in a field at Hammerwich in Staffordshire five years ago.

David Symons from Birmingham Museums told ITV News Central that what they know is that it was for some reason broken up before burial.

There's at least one helmet a sword and weapon fittings used by the warrior elite among the 4000 pieces.

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The Staffordshire Hoard as you've never seen it before

ITV News Central has been given access to the Staffordshire Hoard as the world has never seen it before. All in one place.

This giant jigsaw puzzle of treasure has been put together for just a few precious days while experts try to fathom out what it's all about.

Experts say it is one of the most important Anglo Saxon finds ever made as Pieta Greaves the conservation manager explains:

Normally the Hoard and its 4,000 items are displayed in collections in Birmingham, Lichfield and Stoke.

It has now been brought together for research, not for public display.

Never seen before pictures of the Staffordshire Hoard

The whole of the Staffordshire Hoard has been gathered together in one place for the first time since it was discovered in 2009.

All three-thousand-five-hundred items are being assembled so they can be studied in their entirety by researchers.

All 3,500+ items of the Staffordshire Hoard together for the first time Credit: ITV News Central

Researchers say it is unlikely that the objects, from the 6th and 7th centuries, will be assembled in the same place again for quite some time. Together they are worth in the region of £3.2million.

Items found in a field in Staffordshire date back to the 6th and 7th centuries. Credit: ITV News Central

What is the Staffordshire Hoard?

A new exhibition telling the story of the Staffordshire Hoard is being opened at Staffordshire Place this morning.

The exhibition will tour the West Midlands over the next three years.

  • The Staffordshire Hoard was discovered in a field near the village of Hammerwich, near Lichfield, in Staffordshire, on 5th July 2009.
  • The Hoard is the largest collection of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork ever found, consisting of more than 3,500 items.
  • It totals 5.094 kilos of gold, 1.442 of silver and 3,500 cloisonné garnets.
  • The artefacts have tentatively been dated to the 7th or 8th centuries, placing the origin of the items in the time of the Kingdom of Mercia.

Many hundreds of thousands of people have managed to see the Staffordshire Hoard and this touring exhibition will give even more people the chance to experience the historic and wonderful discovery.

This is our heritage and we are extremely proud of our past. It is also fantastic that the Hoard has returned to the county from which it came, where it is directly benefiting today's economy.

– Philip Atkins, Leader of Staffordshire County Council

For more information visit the Staffordshire Hoard website.

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New exhibition tells story of Staffordshire Hoard

Some of the hoard of items found just below the surface of a cultivated field in south Staffordshire Credit: David Jones/PA Wire

A new exhibition telling the story of the Staffordshire Hoard is being opened this morning.

The Hoard was discovered four years ago and the exhibition will spend the next three years touring the West Midlands.

Staffordshire Hoard cakes are treasures to behold

The Staffordshire Hoard Conservation Team at Birmingham Museum asked people to bake a Hoard themed cake as part of Museum Cake Day yesterday.

The winning cake was made by staff at the McManus Museum and Art Gallery in Dundee and shows metal detector enthusiast Terry Herbert discovering the Hoard on July 5th 2009.

The cake shows the moment Terry Herbert discovers the Staffordshire Hoard

The award for best biscuit went to Anna Stocks which was modelled on item K1184 of the Hoard which can be seen below.

The biscuit is based on item K1184, the actual item can be seen below
Item K1184 of the Staffordshire Hoard Credit: Birmingham Museums Trust

Although the cake replica of the Millefiori glass stud (item K545) did not win judges were impressed with the work by Susannah St Clair Calladine.

Judges were impressed by the Millefiori glass stud cake Credit: Birmingham Museums Trust

Drive to keep treasure hoard together welcomed

Bid to keep treasure hoard together welcomed. Credit: PA

The archaeologist who helped uncover the original pieces of the Staffordshire Hoard has welcomed a campaign to bring new finds back to the West Midlands.

Staffordshire County Council’s Principal Archaeologist Stephen Dean worked in the field in Hammerwich when the largest collection of Anglo-Saxon treasure ever discovered was found in 2009.

Stephen also supervised the recovery of new artefacts from the same field in November 2012.

These were declared part of the Hoard at an inquest and have now been valued at £57,395.

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