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Father raises funds for condition that killed his son

A father from Leicestershire who lost his son to the same condition that caused Fabrice Muamba to collapse during a football match, has been cycling more than 600 miles to raise awareness of the condition.

Joe Humphries' dad and a group of friends, have riden one mile for each life lost to Sudden Arrythmic Heart Disease every year.

Find out more about Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome here

What is Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome?

A father from Leicestershire is taking part in an audacious cycling endeavour in memory of his 14-year-old son who died suddenly from a condition which is killing many young people.

Steve Humphries is cycling 624 miles – the average amount of children who die of sudden death syndrome every year.

What is Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome?

  • Caused by irregularities in the heart beat which can cause sudden death in apparently healthy young people.
  • Warning signs include a family history of unexpected deaths under the age of 40, fainting or seizures during exercise or excitement, chest pain or shortness of breath during exercise.
  • The condition is often passed down from parent to child and around 12 young people die a week unexpectedly.

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624 mile charity bike ride begins

Cycling 624 miles for young people who die from SADS Credit: ITV News Central

Steve Humphries, father of 14 year-old Joe Humphries, who died last October from SADS (Sudden Adult Death Syndrome), is part of a team cycling 624 miles around Rutland Water to raise awareness of the condition. Joe was from Rothley in Leicestershire.

624 is the average number of young people who die from SADS each year.

Steve Humphries lost his son to Sudden Adult Death syndrome last year. Credit: ITV News Central

Cycling event to mark death of teenager

Joe Humphries.
Joe Humphries. Credit: Family handout

A team are cycling 624 miles around Rutland Water today to mark the 624 young lives lost each year to SADS - sudden arrhythmic heart disease, also known as adult cot death.

The event is in memory of 14-year-old Joe Humphries who died while out running in Rothley, Leicestershire last October.

Ten cyclists, representing The Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), will do three laps each.

The cyclists will set off from Whitwell car park, Rutland Water, at 9am today.

Martin Johnson supports Leicestershire fundraising day

Villagers turned out in their hundreds today to support the family of a youngster who collapsed and died whilst out running.

Joe Humphries was just 14 and a victim of Sudden Arrythmic Death Syndrome which claims the lives of 600 young people every year.

Today the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust, supported by former England and Leicester Tigers captain Martin Johnson, held a fundraising day in his home village of Rothley in Leicestershire.

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Two hundred youngsters tested in Wolverhampton for heart defects

Over two-hundred youngsters were screened this weekend in Wolverhampton, after the father of a 26-year old man who died from sudden death syndrome, raised over £7,000 to hold the event.

Dalbad Nagra's son, Pardeep, died in 2008 from sudden arrhythmia death syndrome – a condition that kills around 12 youngster each week in the UK.

On Saturday and Sunday, heart charity CRY (Cardiac Risk in the Young), tested 200 youngsters with an ECG machine, which looks at the rhythm of the heart.

Sudden arrhythmia death syndrome is fatal without appropriate CPR and life-saving equipment. A defibrillator is normally used, which shocks the heart back into normal rhythm.

The two-day screening took place in Wolverhampton from 23-24 February.

Father's campaign to have youngsters screened for heart defects

Dalbad Nagra, campaigner Credit: ITV News Central

The father of a 26-year old man who died from sudden death syndrome, has raised over £7,000 to have 200 youngsters screened for heart defects.

The event, which is taking place in Wolverhampton, has seen youngster tested for abnormalities that could prove fatal if undetected.

Dalbad Nagra's son died in 2008 from sudden arrhythmia death syndrome – a condition that kills around 12 youngster each week across the UK.

"My son was full of life and our lives are very hard now. We are doing this so other families don't have to go through what we went through," says Dalbad.

Heart charity CRY (Cardiac Risk in the Young), have tested the youngsters with an ECG machine, which looks at the rhythm of the heart.

Sudden arrhythmia death syndrome is fatal without appropriate CPR and life-saving equipment. A defibrillator is normally used, which shocks the heart back into normal rhythm.

The two-day screening took place in Wolverhampton yesterday (Saturday February 23) and today.

Mother who lost son to cardiac arrest helps 200 youngsters get screened

The mother of a 26-year old who died of sudden arrhythmia death syndrome has campaigned to raise over £7,000 to get 200 youngsters screened for heart defects.

Her son, Pardeep Nagra, died in 2008. He was a fit and healthy youngster with no previous heart complications.

We think sports clubs and schools should give all children and young adults the opportunity to have an ECG. If kids were screened early while still at school they could be looked after and monitored throughout their lives. It's only a simple test which could benefit so many families and save them from this heartbreak.

– Resham Nagra

The screening took place in Wolverhampton yesterday (Saturday February 23) and today.

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