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Parents say money is not enough over daughter's death

The parents of a teenage girl say she might still be alive today if she had been cared for properly when she was taken to hospital in 2009.

Richard and Jacqueline Carter are speaking out after receiving an out of court settlement from Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust following the death of their 15-year-old daughter Amy. She died three days after being discharged from the Worcestershire Royal Hospital in December 2009.

She was released on 21st December after being diagnosed with glandular fever but then re-admitted on Christmas Eve when she died of septicaemia and multi-organ failure.

In a statement Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust said: "Following Amy's death a full investigation was carried out by the Trust which found that at all stages of her hospital stay, Amy received appropriate care."

Parents want apology over daughter's death

15-year-old Amy Carter died of septicaemia on Christmas Eve in 2009 after being told she had glandular fever. Credit: Family photo

The parents of a teenage girl who died from multiple organ failure two days after being discharged from Worcestershire Royal Hospital have won an out of court settlement from the hospital trust.

15-year-old Amy Carter died on Christmas Eve of septicaemia and multi-organ failure. Her parents had been told she had glandular fever.

Amy's mother and father say there should also have been an apology along with the compensation.

In a statement that hospital said: "All of those involved in Amy's care were extremely saddened to learn of her death and we extend our greatest sympathies to her family.

"Following Amy's death a full investigation was carried out by the Trust which found that at all stages of her hospital stay, Amy received appropriate care. The results of this investigation were shared with Mr and Mrs Carter."

"We are pleased that the legal claim arising from Amy's death has now been resolved."

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Norovirus: people advised to avoid Worcestershire hospitals

Worcestershire Royal Hospital is one of three hospitals affected by norovirus Credit: PA/David Davies

People are being advised to avoid the Alexandra, Kidderminster and Worcestershire Royal Hospitals as cases of norovirus 'continue to put extreme pressure on the system.'

Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust says only family members of patients can make essential visits. It asks for no visitors under the age of 16 in order to prevent the bug spreading to schools.

The Trust says the hospitals are continuing to make progress in bringing norovirus under control.

Worcestershire Hospital accepts wrong doings, report

Worcestershire Royal Hospital has admitted liability in the case of an eleven year old boy who has Cerebral Palsy.

Complications during Daniel Spencer's birth meant his brain was starved of oxygen and permanently damaged.

His parents believe staff at the hospital could have acted faster to deal with the problems.

Worcestershire hospital admits liability in the cerebral palsy birth case

Worcestershire Royal Hospital has admitted liability in the case of an 11-year-old boy with cerebral palsy whose condition was caused by complications at his birth.

Daniel Spencer was born in 2001. His mother suffered a placental abruption during the delivery, depriving him of Oxygen and causing damage to his brain.

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