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Obama posts selfie with 'Bear in the park'

US President Barack Obama joked on instagram about meeting a "Bear in the park" during his three-day trip to Alaska.

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He posted a selfie with British TV adventurer Bear Grylls, who he met during his trip to observe the effects of climate change on the area, with the caption: "Glad this is the only Bear I met in the park - bo."

Obama is trying to build support for tough new rules on carbon emissions from power plants ahead of a hoped-for international climate deal at a UN summit in Paris in December.

Yesterday, he recorded an episode of NBC survival television show, 'Running Wild with Bear Grylls', set to air later this year.

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Obama: We're not moving fast enough on climate change

World leaders must agree to cut carbon emissions at a UN summit in December because the climate is changing faster than efforts to curb global warming, US President Barack Obama has said during a visit to Alaska.

Barack Obama Credit: RTV

The three-day visit is aimed at highlighting the state's melting permafrost and eroding coastlines.

During the visit, US President Barack Obama will trek with British TV adventurer Bear Grylls to observe the effects of climate change on the area.

Obama is trying to build support for tough new rules on carbon emissions from power plants ahead of a hoped-for international climate deal at a UN summit in Paris in December.

Speaking at a meeting of foreign ministers in Alaska, Obama said: "Climate is changing faster than our efforts to address it. That ladies and gentleman must change. We're not acting fast enough.

"This year, in Paris, has to be the year that the world finally reaches an agreement to protect the one planet that we've got while we still can."

Call for more funding to tackle wildfire problem in US

More federal funding is needed to help prevent wildfires in America, officials were told - with experts warning current policies have left forests "explosive".

Wildfires have devastated western US states Credit: Reuters

It comes after dozens of blazes tore through western US states, torching 1.7 million acres (685,000 hectares) of land.

Fire experts addressed a meeting of the US Senate's energy committee in Seattle, Washington, which in recent weeks has seen the largest cluster of deadly fires on record.

Western Washington University's chairman of environmental studies, Michael Medler, told the meeting that increasing use of controlled burns and creating greater barriers between developments and forests were key to cutting the risk of it happening again in future.

To put it bluntly, the last century of fire policies have left our forests explosive.

– Michael Medler, Western Washington University

Thousands of firefighters are still battling more than 60 large fires.

Thirteen have been killed on duty so far this year.

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