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Hoegh Osaka safely back at shore in Southampton

Nineteen days after it was deliberately grounded on a sandbank in the Solent, the stranded car carrier Hoegh Osaka has been towed back to shore.

Four tugs were used in the salvage operation Credit: Andrew Matthews/PA Wire

Four tugs took just over three hours to tow the 51,000-tonne ship back into Southampton Port after salvors managed to reduce its list from 52 to just five degrees.

Tonnes of water had to be pumped out of the ship to reduce the angle of the list, so that when it was docked, the cargo hold doors could be opened for the 1,400 luxury cars inside to be taken out.

People watch as the enormous vessel is towed back to shore Credit: Steve Parsons/PA Wire

The vessel was beached deliberately on Bramble Bank sandbank in a busy shipping lane on January 3 after it began listing as it left Southampton.

The Hoegh Osaka car carrier arrives at Southampton docks Credit: Steve Parsons/PA Wire

Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin has congratulated the salvage experts involved in the operation. He said they battled 'exceptionally difficult weather conditions with extraordinary dedication and courage.'

Stricken Solent ship docks in Southampton

The Hoegh Osaka - the stricken car carrier stuck in the Solent for the last 19 days has been brought back to a dock in Southampton.

Salvage experts had to wait for the weather to improve and for tonnes of water to be pumped out of the ship so it could towed upright.

ITV News Correspondent Rupert Evelyn watched the rescue operation:

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Stricken Solent ship finally on its way back to shore

A 51,000-tonne cargo ship that has been stranded in the Solent since the new year is finally being towed back to Southampton.

The Hoegh Osaka was deliberately run aground on a sandbank between Southampton and the Isle of Wight on January 3rd when crew realised it was in trouble.

Previous efforts to re-float the ship had to be abandoned when salvage experts discovered the vessel had taken on more water than thought.

ITV News Correspondent Rupert Evelyn reports:

Fracking firm 'confident' planning issues can be fixed

The fracking industry has received a setback by planning officers who recommended that proposals for two sites in Lancashire should be rejected over concerns about noise and traffic.

But while campaigners celebrated today, Francis Egan, CEO of Cuadrilla, told ITV News the objections focused on smaller local issues that the company says it is "confident can be addressed."

ITV News Correspondent Ben Chapman reports.

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Greenpeace says Lancashire councillors 'in the spotlight'

Greenpeace said it "applauds" the recommendation council officers published today and urged councillors to follow the advice.

The council now faces a clear choice: They can listen to the planners, and the Lancashire residents that elected them - almost two-thirds of whom want a moratorium on fracking.

Or they can kowtow to the corporate and political interests keen to force through fracking at almost any cost.

The whole country is looking to Lancashire to protect its communities from the unnecessary risks that fracking plays with our futures.

– Simon Clydesdale, Greenpeace

Lancashire fracking proposals 'should be refused'

Council officers have recommended Lancashire County Council refuses permission for "fracking" for shale gas at two sites in Lancashire.

Council leaders should refuse to allow fracking at two sites in Lancashire, planning officers say. Credit: PA Wire

The Lancashire County Council report said bids for the sites, at Preston New Road and Roseacre Wood, should be turned down because of concerns over noise pollution and "an unacceptable impact" on residents.

The council is due to make a final decision on the applications from shale company Cuadrilla next week.

The Government is heavily in favour of shale gas exploration in the UK saying it would create jobs, growth and cheaper energy bills.

If council leaders agree with the report's recommendations, it will be seen as a major blow to the industry.

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