Two-year-old boy's fight for life - and a diagnosis

George Johnson's doctors are baffled by his condition Photo:

The parents of a two-year-old boy from Wirral are trying to raise money to get their son potentially lifesaving treatment in America.

George Johnson has spent most of his life in hospital.

Since he was born he has been unable to eat or drink. He has a problem with his digestive system which means if he eats anything, it simply refluxes back up. The food can go into his lungs, causing problems like pneumonia.

George is kept alive by a feeding tube direct into his heart

He survives by being fed through a tube straight into his heart.

George's condition has baffled doctors, who don't even know what is wrong with him.

George's mother Emma Johnson said: "At Great Ormond Street, George's consultant calls it the George Syndrome.

"They said they've never seen anything like whats going on with George ... they just don't understand - they know George's system doesn't work but they don't know why."

During his short life, George has already had more than 50 operations and proceedures. He is in constant pain but doctors say they are running out of ideas.

Neil Johnson, George's father, said: "It's heartbreaking - we're in a situation where we just don't know what road to turn down, we've had all sorts of different procedures done and watched him go through hell and back really but we just keep hoping and praying we will get a solution and we will get him better."

George's parents hope doctors in the US will be able to give them a diagnosis

The feeds that are keeping him alive also carry a huge risk of infection - potentially fatal.

George almost died at Christmas because of an infection.

His family are desperate to get a diagnosis and get George better, and believe America may be their only option.

They're trying to raise £100,000 to get him to a specialist hospital in the US for more tests, which they hope will help him.

For more information about George and his condition, visit the Team George website.