Murderer Kiaran Stapleton tried to attack chaplain in prison

A murderer who labelled himself "Psycho" after murdering a student in the street has tried to attack a prison chaplain.

Kiaran Stapleton shot Indian student Anuj Bidve, 23, at point-blank range in Salford, Greater Manchester, in the early hours of Boxing Day last year.

Stapleton, 21, was seen by witnesses to laugh as he stood over the body of his victim before he ran off.

He was jailed for life in July and ordered to serve a minimum of 30 years before he would be considered for release.

Sources confirmed today that Stapleton tried to attack a prison chaplain at maximum-security Full Sutton prison, near York.

It is understood Stapleton attempted to attack the priest with a pen but was restrained by guards before he could injure the chaplain.

A Prison Service spokesperson said: "On November 30 a Full Sutton prisoner attempted to assault a member of the chaplaincy during worship. The police have been notified."

According to a report in The Sun, Stapleton carried out the attack after losing an appeal against his 30-year jail sentence.

Stapleton was convicted of murder by a jury at Manchester Crown Court after it rejected his defence that he had committed manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility.

Sentencing him, Mr Justice King said: "In my judgment, this was no impulsive act on your part.

"It was a piece of cold-blooded controlled aggression."

He said he had showed a "most callous disregard" in laughing and smirking after he gunned down Mr Bidve and also during the trial.

"You have behaved in a way demonstrating that you are positively boastful about having killed Mr Bidve," he said.

Following the verdict, Mr Bidve's father Subhash said Stapleton had "openly laughed at the memory of our son".

His son had arrived in the UK to study micro-electronics at Lancaster University and was visiting Manchester with a group of friends last Christmas.

They left their hotel in Salford to queue early for the sales when their paths crossed with Stapleton's.

He calmly walked across the road and repeatedly asked for the time.

When someone finally answered, he pulled a handgun out of his pocket and fired one shot to Mr Bidve's left temple.

Stapleton told one psychologist in prison that he picked out his victim because "he had the biggest head", the court heard.

The day after the murder he booked into a hotel which overlooked the crime scene in Ordsall Lane and then later went to a tattoo parlour and had a teardrop design placed below his right eye - a symbol used by some gangs to mark that the wearer has killed someone.

After he was arrested and charged with murder, he made his first appearance at Manchester Magistrates' Court and gave his name as "Psycho Stapleton".

In a show of bravado, Stapleton told the jury during his trial that he "loved prison".

He said: "To be honest, I'm not bothered. I love prison. I watch Coronation Street. I have got a fat canteen. I love prison. Lock me up for 65 years."

Looking to the jury from the witness box, he added: "Does this face look bothered? I have even got a new rug and bedding coming for my cell. I'm not bothered."