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  1. ITV Report

Paralympic gold winner Kadeena Cox has medals stolen

A double Paralympic champion has made an emotional appeal for information after two of her medals were stolen.

Paralympic gold winner Kadeena Cox has had World Championship medals stolen Credit: PA/MEN Syndication

Kadeena Cox said the IPC Athletics World Championships gold medals were taken from her car, which was parked outside her home in Prestwich, Bury.The 26-year-old won the medals in the T37 women’s 100m and T35-38 4x100m relay at the 2015 World Championships in Doha.

Writing on Facebook she said:

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Cox also posted the appeal on Twitter:

Speaking from her training camp in America, Kadenna Cox told the Manchester Evening News:

“I had taken my medals out because I was doing some filming with them. “When I got home I unpacked the car and took my Paralympics medals inside, but didn’t have enough hands to grab everything so left the two world championship medals behind. “Unfortunately I forgot to go back and get them and went to London the next day. “While I was away it had been preying on my mind that I’d left them in the car so as soon as I got home I went to get them. “But when I got to my car I noticed the door was slightly ajar and I knew straight away they’d been stolen. “I must admit, I cried, I worked my butt off for those medals, so to have them taken away is really frustrating. “Anyone who knows me knows my story and knows what I’ve been through to get those medals. “They’re worth much more than money to me, so I would say please, if anyone knows anything about the theft, please get in touch. I’m desperate to get them back.”

– Kadeena Cox

The medals were stolen overnight on June 7. In Rio Cox, who had a stroke aged 23, and was later diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, became the first Briton since 1988 to win a medal in two sports at the same Paralympics. She also took athletics silver in the 4x100m relay and bronze in the 100m, and was picked to be Britain’s flagbearer at the closing ceremony.