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The pen that ended World War 2

A simple pen with an amazing WWII story is to be displayed in Chester. On September 2nd 1945 the pen was used by US General Douglas MacArthur to sign a formal surrender ceremony that, following Japan’s surrender, effectively brought an end to World War II.

The pen used to sign the papers that ended World War 2

Lt General Percival was in charge of forces in Malaysia that fell to the Japanese in 1942. Forced to surrender, he was held in a Japanese prisoner of war camp. After Japan’s surrender in WWII, MacArthur secured Percival’s release and bought him on board the USS Missouri to witness the Japanese signing the surrender. MacArthur then presented the pen to Percival.

At the end of the war, General Percival was part of the Cheshire Regiment and Yeomanry and he donated the pen to the regiment before his death in 1966.

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A place for reflection: 'invisible' shed wins top prize

“Invisibility Tardis Shed of Navel Contemplation. Credit: Manchester School of Art

An 'invisible shed' has scooped the top prize in the 'Shed of the Year' competitiion at RHS Tatton.

Manchester School of Art were joint winners of the 'Shed of the Year' prize with their 'Invisibility Tardis Shed of Navel Contemplation.'

Clare Knox Bentham and Adrian Digaudio Manchester School of Art Credit: Manchester School of Art

As well as a mirrored exterior, the shed has mirrored walls on the inside reflecting any visitor back on themselves infinitely.

As a finishing touch, the artists added a mirror ball, turning the humble garden shed into a miniature disco.

Liverpool actor Mark Moraghan on his legacy as Thomas the Tank Engine narrator

Thomas the Tank Engine Credit: HiT Entertainment

Liverpool actor Mark Moraghan says his role as narrator on 'Thomas and Friends' is a great legacy for his children and grandchildren.

Mark follows in the footsteps of Ringo Starr and Michael Angelis as the third Liverpudlian narrator of the children's classic which has been loved by generations.

He says the makers seem to want to keep the scouse accent.

I don't know why, but it seems to work.

– Mark Moraghan

Mark will feature in a new Thomas film called 'Sodor’s Legend of the Lost Treasure' which will mark the 70th anniversary of Thomas the Tank Engine.

Video of sing-song on Manchester train goes viral

A video of Manchester man leading a sing-song on a train has gone viral.

Stephen Jones, 56, was filmed singing The Beatles hit 'Twist and Shout' on the Mossley to Stalybridge service.

Mr Jones whose performance has been viewed over 100,000 time said:

I’d had a few beers and once I got on the train it just came over me and I started up singing.

“Then people on the train joined in and it went from there.

“My repertoire is the same ones my wife will tell you she’s been hearing for the last 30 years. “I’ve sung on trains before and I’ll usually end up leading a singalong at a funeral, after everyone’s gone back to the house.

“Obviously if I started singing and offended someone I would stop, but generally the response is good.

“I like putting a smile on peoples’ faces.”

– Stephen Jones
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