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What's bringing Chinese investment to the North West?

What impact is Chinese investment having in the North West?

Following President Xi Xinping's historic visit last year, Chinese investors have began to pour billions into Manchester.

But, as more and more Chinese citizens buy property in the city, there are concerns rents will rise and outprice locals.

Our political correspondent Daniel Hewitt has been investigating:

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Liverpool chosen as Northern HQ for doctors group

Liverpool has been chosen as the new Northern headquarters for one of the world’s most renowned medical institutions – The Royal College of Physicians (RCP). The investment deal is being hailed as more proof of a committment to the Northern Powerhouse championed by former Chancellor George Osborne.
It will be the RCP's first centre of excellence outside London. Liverpool’s successful bid will see the RCP become the first anchor tenant of the Mayor of Liverpool’s £1bn flagship scheme to establish a world leading medical and scientific research hub. Its hoped it will lead to the creation of thousands of highly skilled jobs in the region.

MPs approve plans for four new Trident nuclear submarines

HMS Vanguard Credit: PA

MPs have voted to approve a motion to renew Trident, the UK's nuclear deterrent.

472 MPs voted in favour of the plans while 117 voted against the motion to replace the four Vanguard class submarines with four new submarines which have been codenamed 'Successor'.

Production of the £40 billion fleet of submarines will take place in Cumbria at the BAE Systems plant in Barrow where 8,000 people are employed.

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  1. Amy Welch, ITV News

MPs vote on the future of Trident - 8,000 Barrow jobs depend on it

The previous generation of Trident, HMS Vengeance, being rolled out at Barrow Shipyard in 1998. Credit: Press Association.

Barrow is waiting for a vote in Parliament to decide its future as part of the UK's nuclear defence programme.

Almost 8,000 people work at the BAe plant in Cumbria - most of them on the Vanguard-class submarines which carry Trident nuclear missiles.

MPs will vote on whether the UK Government goes ahead with spending up to £50bn on a fleet of new subs codenamed Successor.

  • Granada Reports correspondent Amy Welch looks at what the industry means to the region:
  1. National

May: Some MPs 'the first to defend our enemies'

Theresa May accused Green MP Caroline Lucas and some Labour MPs of defending the country's enemies, as MPs prepare to vote on renewing Trident.

The MP for Brighton Pavilion had said the UK's nuclear weapons are "driving proliferation - not the opposite", before the prime minister rejected the suggestion, saying: "I have to say to you that sadly you and some members of the Labour Party seem to be the first to defend the country's enemies and the last to actually accept the capabilities that we need."

Mrs May said it is "a great pity" that members of the Labour front bench "fail to see the necessity" of Britain's nuclear deterrent "given that the Labour party in the past has put the British national interest first in looking at this issue."

Speaking in the Commons, the prime minister added that we "cannot afford to relax our guard" and "need to be prepared to deter threats to our lives and our livelihoods."

  1. National

Corbyn questions the effectiveness of nuclear deterrent

Jeremy Corbyn

The Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has questioned the effectiveness of Trident, as MPs prepare to vote on renewal of Britain's nuclear deterrent.

Speaking in the Commons, he said: "What is the threat that we are facing that over a million people's deaths actually deters?

"It's not from the so-called Islamic State - their poisonous death cult glories in killing as many people as possible, as we've seen brutally in Syria, to east Africa, from France to Turkey.

"It hasn't deterred our ally, Saudi Arabia, from committing dreadful acts in the Yemen. It didn't stop Saddam Hussein's atrocities in the 1980s or the invasion of Kuwait in 1990. It didn't deter the war crimes in the Balkans in the 1990s, nor the genocide in Rwanda.

"I do not believe the threat of mass murder is a legitimate to go about dealing with international relations."

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