Live updates

New complaints over abuse at Rochdale's Knowl View

Knowl View.
Knowl View.

Further victims have come forward to make complaints of abuse at Knowl View, a former residential school for boys in Rochdale.

Greater Manchester Police said 18 victims have so far come forward and the complaints relate to child abuse from 1969 until the school closed in 1990.

The allegations relate to physical and sexual abuse that took place by adults upon pupils and between the pupils themselves.

Over the last month 14 men, aged between 35 and 66 have been interviewed under caution for a variety of offences including allegations of both sexual and physical offences.

“The investigation into abuse at Knowl View School continues and since the start of the inquiry further victims have come forward.

“These are serious allegations made against both staff and pupils at the school and are being thoroughly investigated.

“We are currently working through the allegations and as a result 14 people so far have been interviewed under caution.

“Greater Manchester Police takes allegations of abuse very seriously and continues to do so and if anyone has been a victim of abuse, we ask them to contact us.”

– Detective Chief Superintendent Russ Jackson, Greater Manchester Police

Advertisement

Advertisement

World's largest Viking Longship arrives at Peel harbour on the Isle of Man

Dragon Harald Fairhair
Dragon Harald Fairhair calls in to Isle of Man en route to Liverpool Credit: ITV Amy Mulhern

The world's largest Viking longship has arrived at Peel on the Isle of Man it will stay at the harbour for two days. Named after Harald Fairhair, the king who unified Norway - it's on its way to Liverpool as part of european tour.

Dragon Harald Fairhair, Isle of Man
Dragon Harald Fairhair, Isle of Man Credit: ITV Amy Mulhern

Fish called 'Bonaparte' to help save his species

Napoleon Wrasse
Napoleon Wrasse fish christened 'Bonaparte' Credit: Sea Life Centre Manchester

'Bonaparte' is a new to the Sea Life Centre in Manchester and the hope is he can play a key role in saving his entire species. He is a giant 'Napoleon Wrasse' fish - they are under threat due to the methods used by fishermen who use cyanide to stun fish in Australian seas.

Napoleon Wrasse Fish
'Bonaparte' who will play a part in saving his species of 'Napoleon Wrasse' Credit: Sea Life Centre, Manchester

It's hoped that 'Bonaparte' will become the stud in a breeding programme at the centre to help save these giant fish. He will have to wait for his ‘Josephines’ however, as the plan is to let him settle before introducing females in a few months time.

Napoleon Wrasse fish
'Bonaparte' settling into his tank at the Sea Life Centre, Manchester Credit: ITV Granada

Bonaparte is nearly three-feet long and hails from Australian seas, where Napoleon wrasse are still found in good numbers. However in the Indo-Pacific region they're being captured by fishermen using cyanide, chiefly to provide the Asian ‘live food’ trade…especially restaurants in Hong Kong.

Parents show support for @Barrowfordsch Head for KS2 test letter

C46d64edafb1675a368ee2f194a23309_normal

Dear @michaelrosenyes thought you might like (as much as poss anyway) the KS2 test letter home from our headteacher https://t.co/ciQ2qjVvNA

Load more updates