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Calls to improve care for motor neurone disease patients

John Boulton Credit: ITV

There are calls for more to be done to improve the lives of people with motor neurone disease. The devastating muscle wasting condition will kill a third of those who have it within a year.

Granada spoke to John Boulton from Sale who told us equipment can take too long to reach those who desperately need it. The 77 year old can no longer use his voice but told us his story through a computer.

To combat the problem the MND association have devised a charter they want councils to sign up to as a commitment to better care for those with the condition. They say it's very much a collaborative process with local authorities and understand financial pressures on health and social care budgets.

But so far in the North West only around 20% of councils have signed up. Chris James the director of external affairs at the the MND association told Granada the difficulty with the illness is that it's rare and "doesn't get the attention some other conditions have locally."

Read more about the charter and how you can get involved here.

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High tech scan could be 'game changer' for heart patients

Doctors say a high-tech hospital scan being piloted at a Liverpool hospital could be a 'game changer' for patients with suspected heart problems.

It creates a 3D simulation of the heart, so doctors can see what's going on without the need for invasive tests.

One father from Merseyside whose arteries were blocked says it's already proved to be a life saver.

He's been talking to Amy Welch reports.

Health Secretary orders investigation into NMC's handing of hospital baby death scandal

Joshua Titcombe who died after failings at Morecambe Bay Hospital Credit: Titcombe family

The father of Joshua Titcombe one of 11 babies to die after failings at Furness General's maternity unit has welcomed an investigation into the Nursing and Midwifery watchdog's handling of the baby death scandal.

The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has asked the Professional Standards Authority to carry out an independent investigation into the Nursing and Midwifery Council's handling of failings at Morecambe Bay NHS Trust.

The NMC's investigations are still ongoing more than eight years after the first complaints were made linking midwives to poor care at the trust.

An inquiry into failings at the trust by Bill Kirkup fin 2015 found a 'lethal mix' of failings lead to the avoidable deaths of at least 11 babies and one mother.

The inquiry said the midwives at Furness general were so cavalier they became known as “the musketeers”, with a culture of denial, collusion and incompetence.

James Titcombe, who along with a number of parents has campaigned for change said it was a 'relief' to know the 'ineptitude' of the NMC will be properly examined.

Natalie's special anniversary

  • For more information on organ donation in the UK visit the website here.

A woman who had a double lung transplant is celebrating the fifth anniversary of her operation.

Young mother Natalie Kerr, from Adlington in Lancashire, is marking the milestone with a party to raise funds for Wythenshawe Hospital. Its a thank you for the care she's received there.

She wants people to think about becoming donors and says she sees the five years since the transplant as a bonus for her and her two children Brandon and Isabelle.

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Watch: Former heart patient will run for hospital that saved him

A new heart scan which enables doctors to diagnose coronary heart disease without the need for invasive tests has been hailed a success.

Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital have been trialling the new technology which creates a 3D simulation of the heart so that doctors can see if any arteries are blocked.

For John Roberts from Southport, its transformed his life.

Some months ago he was told some of his arteries were 90 percent blocked but now he's getting ready to run a half marathon. Our correspondent Amy Welch has been to meet him.

  • For more information on John's fundraising campaign visit his JustGiving page.

Fears people may be forced into care homes because of health cuts

A charity has warned elderly or disabled people may be forced out of their homes because of cuts to health budgets.

An investigation carried out in Greater Manchester by a disability charity, fears the move is being considered, if it costs less to look after people in a care home.

Salford MP Barbara Keeley has described the situation as 'deeply worrying'

Mel Barham has spoken to one man, who's worried about his long term future.

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