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Watch: Investigation into A&E mental health crisis

There has been an alarming rise in the number of people with mental health problems who feel they've got nowhere to go for treatment other than their local A&E.

An exclusive investigation by Granada Reports has revealed more than 40- thousand people with psychiatric issues went to A&E in the North West in the last three years - a rise of almost 70 per cent.

The Government says it's investing millions in support.

Charities and people affected say mental health services are collapsing due to cuts.

Sarah Rogers has this report:

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Watch: 19-year-old hasn't grown since she was eight

Pearl Kelly will spend the rest of her life at just over four-feet-tall.

The 19 year old has a condition causing tumours to grow along her nerves which has meant years of painful surgery, missed days at school and hospital visits four times a month.

Pearl, 19, had her spine fused by doctors when she was just eight years old to fight the disease called neurofibromatosis, which led to a curved spine. The only cure was to have metal rods and screws attached by surgeons to try and keep her spine straight.

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Preston MP calls on the government to intervene in Chorley A&E crisis

The Preston MP Mark Hendrick has called on the government to intervene in the closure of Chorley's Accident and Emergency department.

Chorley A&E closed in April due to a lack of doctors. Lancashire Teaching Hospitals Trust says it won't re-open until April 2017 as it would be unsafe to do otherwise without the correct number of staff.

The latest figures from the North West Ambulance Service show the number of patients waiting over an hour to be handed over from an ambulance to hospital staff at the Royal Preston trebled in May from 43 to 141, the month after Chorley's closure. The number waiting over 30 minutes went from 166 to 313.

The Trust says Chorley is not the main factor for the increase. Year-on-year there are 40 more patients attending the Royal Preston each day, 13 of those are from the Chorley area. The Trust instead says it is facing greater demand from the local population, an issue facing hospitals across the UK.

Mark Hendrick says the government needs to 'get a grip' of Chorley's staffing problem, as well as the wider 'national problem'.

Watch: Lancashire Hospital Teaching Trust crisis deepens

New figures reveal that in the month after the closure of Chorley A&E, the number of people kept waiting in ambulances outside the Royal Preston Hospital trebled.

The MP for Wigan Lisa Nandy says her local emergency unit is also under significant pressure.

But Lancashire Hospital Teaching Trust maintains the closure of Chorley is not to blame. ITV Granada's Political Correspondent Daniel Hewitt has more:

Watch: Report on hospital trust's 'inadequate' ratings

Two of the region's hospitals have been called unsafe, understaffed and poorly led. NorthManchester General and the Royal Oldham Hospital were inspected over nine days,back in February.

The result is a rating ofinadequate - the lowest of all - from health watchdogs.

The Care QualityCommission also raised concerns about the overall trust that runs thehospitals, but they did find that staff were caring. Since then, hospitalbosses say huge improvements have been made and patients need not worry.

Rob Smith has this report.

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