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Morecambe MP wants tunnel under bay

David Morris wants a transport tunnel under Morecambe Bay Credit: Creative Commons

The Morecambe and Lunesdale MP says he will move for a transport tunnel under Morecambe Bay.

The National Grid plans to build a tunnel for utilities, and Mr Morris said the same structure could be used for vehicles.

He said: “I have tabled a Parliamentary question and already have had a conversation with the Chancellor George Osborne and the Secretary of State for Transport about the prospect of a tunnel under Morecambe Bay. There will be mutual benefits, a tunnel would improve the economy here in Morecambe & Lunesdale allowing people from places like Barrow easy access to day trip to Morecambe and will give commuters better access to the other side of the bay especially those who work at places such as BAE Systems in Barrow. A tunnel would also open up some of the health care services currently available across the other side of the bay.”

Mr Morris continued: “I must stress it is very early days but I do endorse the National Grid’s tunnel option and it does prove that a traffic tunnel can be built. I am quietly confident with enough support we can make this a reality.

“The Chancellor has already announced plans to link Northern cities via rail and I think this tunnel would complement that plan nicely.”

An exhibition featuring one of the world's greatest experiments opens in Manchester

The research facility Atlas of CERN in Geneva. Credit: : Rainer Jensen/DPA/Press Association Images

An exhibition of one of the greatest scientific experiments of our time opens in Manchester.

The Museum of Science and Industry (MOSI) is the first stop in a tour of the Large Hadron Collider exhibition.

It 'transports' visitors into a virtual a tour of the CERN particle physics laboratory in Geneva.

Professor Brian Cox at National Television Awards. Credit: Dominic Lipinski/PA Archive/Press Association Images

Brian Cox, Professor of Particle Physics at the University of Manchester, has a cameo role in the critically acclaimed exhibition.

He said,

"I'm looking forward to seeing Collider open in Manchester, not just because it's my home town.

In the exhibition I only get to be the tea boy, but I can tell you that CERN is an extraordinary place, and the exhibition team have done a great job of capturing the excitement, awe and wonder of the LHC and particle physics."

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Asteroids 'causing nuclear-scale explosions above Earth'

Powerful asteroids hitting the Earth's atmosphere caused 26 nuclear-scale explosions between 2000 and 2013, including one that was much stronger than the atom bomb that destroyed Hiroshima, a report has found.

Artist's impression of the asteroid belt surrounding the star Vega, the second brightest star in the northern night sky Credit: PA/Nasa

The findings came from the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organisation, a global infrasound network that detects nuclear weapon detonations and recorded the impacts over 13 years.

Most explosions occurred too high in the atmosphere to cause any serious damage on Earth but "the only thing preventing a catastrophe from a ‘city-killer’-sized asteroid has been blind luck," said former astronaut Ed Lu as he revealed the data at the Museum of Flight in Seattle today, NBC reported.

Mr Lu added that while large asteroids have been detected, "less than 10,000 of the more than a million dangerous asteroids with the potential to destroy an entire major metropolitan area have been found."

100 new jobs at Bentley in Crewe

Bentley Motors Credit: PA

Bentley motors are creating 100 new jobs at their headquarters in Crewe.

The factory is to become a centre of excellence for Volkswagen W12 engine production.

W12 engine Credit: Bentley

Dr. Wolfgang Schreiber, Chairman and Chief Executive of Bentley Motors, said: “This is an important step, not just for Bentley but also for the UK manufacturing sector.

This W12 centre of excellence is recognition of the long standing engine manufacturing expertise we have that has resulted in performance improvements across the model ranges over recent years.

The production of this advanced engine and its future generations will bring new technologies and skills to Crewe.”

Jodrell's new telescopes will stretch to Australia

The beginnings of the new array in the Australian desert Credit: PA

Jodrell Bank's new telescope array is being built in Australia and South Africa.

The Square Kilometre Array will be run from the observatory in Cheshire, combining signals from telescopes across the southern hemisphere.

Scientists will use the SKA to survey space faster and deeper than ever before. It will also be the biggest array of its kind in the world.

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Millions for Jodrell Bank to study 'galactic evolution'

Jodrell Bank to be HQ for new radio telescope Credit: PA

The government is investing £100m in the Jodrell Bank Observatory in Cheshire, to scan the skies for clues to the evolution of the galaxy.

Jodrell will become the headquarters of a new radio telescope network called the Square Kilometre Array.

Science Minister, David Willets said: “Investment in science is a crucial part of this government’s long-term economic plan. It’s about investing in our future, helping grow new industries and create more jobs – and that will mean more financial security for people across the country.”

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