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Watch: Football legend Jimmy's moving interview about dementia

Blackpool and England hero Jimmy Armfield is appearing in a new video campaign about dementia.

It's a subject close to the footballer's heart, his great friend the Preston North End legend Sir Tom Finney suffered dementia before he died.

Jimmy's appearing in a film, raising awareness of dementia, that has been produced as part of Altogether Now - A Legacy for Blackpool.

That's the partnership between the NHS in Blackpool, Blackpool Clinical Commissioning Group and Hospitals Trust, Blackpool Council and Blackpool FC.

In the interview, Jimmy, a health ambassador for the project, said he had become much more aware of the condition as he himself got older.

Man suffering from dementia missing in Royton

This picture was taken about 6 years ago, Steven's hair is now grey and he no longer wears glasses Credit: GMP

A man suffering from dementia has gone missing from his home on Castleton Road in Royton.

Steven Hewitt, 56, was last seen by a neighbour at around 3pm on January 20th. He was on Bury Road heading towards Rochdale town centre.

He is described as being of medium build, 5ft 6in tall and he is believed to be wearing dark jeans and a dark coloured coat. He is thought to have distinct blue trainers with white soles on.

Steven suffers from dementia and has carers who attend his address on a daily basis to cook, clean and provide basic care for him.

Steven has dementia and has been missing since 9am today so, naturally, there are real concerns about his welfare.

So please, if you know of Steven’s whereabouts, please call police on 101 as soon as possible.

– Inspector Mark Davies, based at Oldham

In Memory of Mum: MP opens dementia courtyard

Hazel Blears and her Mum Credit: MEN Syndication

MP Hazel Blears is opening a special garden at Salford Royal today. It provides a therapeutic environment for patients. The MP for Salford, lost her mother earlier this year at the hospital following a nine-year battle with the illness.

The Dementia Courtyard, which is situated in the Ladywell Buildingat Salford Royal, includes an old red telephone box and will be filled with various props to help patients reminisce and to stimulate memories.

The area is a peaceful haven for patients and their relatives and will reduce agitation and stress, which can occur as a result of boredom or being in unfamiliar surroundings.

It will also provide a safe place for gentle exercise, which in turn will promote appetite and aid sleep.

The new garden is part of an ongoing programme of developments as Salford Royal continues to improve its facilities in order to further enhance the quality of care and experience for patients with dementia.

Dementia garden to help patients at Salford Royal

“Having a safe and peaceful area for patients with a cognitive impairment will encourage social interaction and a sense of well-being. Staff can spend time with patients in the garden and will gather a more personal insight into the individual while relatives can enjoy relaxing with their loved ones in a very tranquil environment.”

– Janice McGrory Nurse for Dementia

North West team try to unlock secret of dementia

A team from the North West undertaking one of the worlds largest studies to try and unlock the secret of what causes dementia.

A hundred thousand people will be part of a detailed project over the next five years capturing images of their brains.

800,000 people in the UK are currently living with the condition.

Our correspondent Matt O'Donoghue has more:


Health minister: Salford is spearheading dementia care

Health minister Norman Lamb visited Salford to hear how the city is leading the way in dementia care and research.

He visited the Humphrey Booth Resource Centre helps people with dementia to live well by putting on activities including cooking, arts and crafts, and reminiscence sessions using objects from yesteryear.

Facilities include gardens with safe flooring and seating areas, assisted exercise machines and a telecare room with gadgets to help people with dementia live more independently.

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