Live updates

Special Report: Paul Crone on the reburial of the six unknown soldiers in Ypres

In the second of his special reports on the unknown soldiers found in a field in Belgium Paul Crone meets those who've ensured their remains were reburied with full military honours.

Photos: courtesy of Emmanuel Brill/Jean Michel van Elslade.

Advertisement

Paying respects to the unknown soldiers from WW1

Six soldiers from the North West who died in the trenches of Belgium during World War One have been buried with honours.

The remains of the men from The Lancashire Fusiliers and The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment lay undiscovered for nearly 100 years in a farmer's field near Ypres.

But a team of local archaeologists managed to track down which Lancashire regiments they belonged to.

Adam Carr, from Warrington, is a Kingsman with the Duke of Lancaster's regiment and acted as a pall bearer during the ceremony. He said their sacrifice should never be forgotten.

  1. Paul Crone, ITV News

Special Report: Honours at last for Lancashire's fallen heroes of World War One

Six British soldiers from the North West who died in the trenches of Belgium during World War One have finally been buried with honours.

The remains of the men from The Lancashire Fusiliers and The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment lay undiscovered for nearly 100 years in a farmer's field near Ypres.

But a team of local archaeologists managed to track down which Lancashire regiments they belonged to, and even made sure the men would be laid to rest with full military honours.

Paul Crone has the first of two special reports:

Who are the North West's unidentified fallen at Ypres?

The six soldiers were laid to rest anonymously Credit: ITV

Granada Reports has travelled to Belgium to reveal the story of the bodies of six soldiers found in a farmer's field near Ypres.

The remains of uniforms and cap badges proved two of the men were from the Lancashire Fusiliers, two from The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment and the final two remain unidentified.

They have now been reburied with full military honours at Prowse Point Cemetery near Ploegsteert near Ypres but their names will likely remain a mystery.

Advertisement

Accrington pays tribute to its fallen heroes

A Lancashire town came to a standstill today as thousands turned out to remember the legendary Accrington Pals.

On the anniversary of the Battle of the Somme in World War 1, when the Pals' suffered huge losses, the streets were packed as the Duke of Lancaster's Regiment marched through the town in memory of the Pals.

And in true Lancastrian fashion it wasn't a sombre affair as Paul Crone reports.

Gallery: Accrington honours its heroes of the Armed Forces

Service as Accrington honours soldiers past and present. Credit: Paul Crone/ITV News
Crowds gather ahead of the parade. Credit: Paul Crone/ITV News
Hundreds have gathered for today's events. Credit: Paul Crone/ITV News
1 Lancs parade through Accrington. Credit: Paul Crone/ITV News
Duke of Lancaster's marching band. Credit: Paul Crone/ITV News

Soldiers parade in honour of Accrington Pals

Soldiers from the 1st Battalion Duke of Lancaster's Regiment will march through Accrington today.

The regiment, known as the lions of England, will pay tribute to the Pals - who suffered significant losses on this day in 1916, at the start of the Battle of the Somme.

It's also eight years today that the Duke of Lancaster's Regiment was formed.

The history of The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment importantly includes the Accrington Pals so it is fitting that they have chosen this the centenary year of the outbreak of the first World War to exercise the Freedom of the Borough.

"The Regiment already has the Freedom of the Borough of Hyndburn and we want to demonstrate our pride and thanks to our soldiers who risk their lives both at home and abroad to serve our country.

"The parade will give the people of Hyndburn the opportunity to show their appreciation on behalf of the Borough for their gallant and courageous service."

– Leader of the Council, Cllr Miles Parkinson

It is a tremendous honour for the Regiment and its soldiers to exercise the Freedom of Hyndburn, and it is fitting that we will do so in the home town of the Accrington Pals on the anniversary of their great sacrifice.

"Parades such as this give us an opportunity to publicly express our gratitude to the communities our soldiers come from."

– Colonel Chris Owen, of The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

The annual Accrington Pals Memorial service at the Pals Memorial on Church St Accrington will also take place on July 1 at 11.30am.

The time of the march and the parade route are available on the Council's website.

Load more updates