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Artwork planned to transform iconic building in time for Battle of the Somme commemorations

How The Lyceum could look later this year Credit: Liverpool Bid Company

Plans have been unveiled to transform an iconic building in Liverpool to mark the centenary of the Battle of the Somme during the First World War.

Liverpool BID Company have commissioned local artists to reflect ‘the human story of the war’ by using an archive of letters from soldiers to their loved ones held at Liverpool John Moores University.

The giant commemorative artwork is to animate The Lyceum, a Grade II* listed building on Bold Street, which for many years was a post office and is currently vacant.

Designed by The Sound Agents: John Campbell and Moira Kenny, the installation will see five 14m high panels fixed between the building’s Doric columns.

It will also incorporate a poppy motif as a tribute to the fallen as well as a salute to the Weeping Window installation that adorned St George’s Hall, which attracted more than 350,000 people over the winter.

The project was devised as part of Liverpool’s Healthy High Street programme, which aims to increase footfall and reduce the number of vacant units in the city centre, and subject to planning approval could be installed by mid-May.

‘’We were truly overwhelmed by the response to the poppies at St George’s Hall but it is important that Liverpool continues to commemorate the events of World War I as so many people from this city paid the ultimate sacrifice.

‘’For their families the only thing they had to remember them by was their letters and how our soldiers managed to pen and send them in truly horrific conditions is a minor miracle. We are fortunate in Liverpool to have such a precious archive that has recorded their stories for us all to see what war truly means.

‘’I hope by using The Lyceum in this compelling way we manage to put a spotlight on this very human aspect of the war and in doing so remind everyone that this city will never forget those who never returned home.’’

– Joe Anderson, Mayor of Liverpool

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Appeal to return lost war medal to rightful owner

Anyone with information about Private Harrison or his family should call 01772 317500. Credit: United Utilities.

An online campaign has been launched to help reunite a World War One Victory Medal with the soldier’s family after it was found in a Manchester sewer.

Brothers Jason and Shaun Dullaghan were carrying out routine cleaning work on Byfield Road in Wythenshawe, when they discovered the WWI medal at the bottom of a manhole.

The search is now on to reunite the medal, inscribed with 32266 PTE W Harrison, with the family it belongs to.

The picture of the medal and appeal for information about Pte Harrison has been tweeted and shared with the hashtag #ReuniteMe.

Jason, who works for Amey on behalf of water company United Utilities, said: “We were really lucky to spot the medal when we did; another minute or so and we’d have cleared the drain and it would have been lost forever.

“At first we thought it was a coin of some sort, it wasn’t until we looked closer that we realised what it was. We know that getting the medal back to the soldier’s family 100 years after the war is a long shot but it would be nice to hand it over to the rightful owners.”

“We find all kinds of odd things in the sewers, from false teeth to stolen goods, but this is the first time we have found anything with such emotional value as this medal.

"It’s sad to think how it was lost but we’re glad to have found it now.”

– Tony Griffiths, wastewater network manager at United Utilities
  • Anyone with information about Private Harrison or his family can get in touch by calling 01772 317500.

Special Report: Paul Crone on the reburial of the six unknown soldiers in Ypres

In the second of his special reports on the unknown soldiers found in a field in Belgium Paul Crone meets those who've ensured their remains were reburied with full military honours.

Photos: courtesy of Emmanuel Brill/Jean Michel van Elslade.

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Paying respects to the unknown soldiers from WW1

Six soldiers from the North West who died in the trenches of Belgium during World War One have been buried with honours.

The remains of the men from The Lancashire Fusiliers and The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment lay undiscovered for nearly 100 years in a farmer's field near Ypres.

But a team of local archaeologists managed to track down which Lancashire regiments they belonged to.

Adam Carr, from Warrington, is a Kingsman with the Duke of Lancaster's regiment and acted as a pall bearer during the ceremony. He said their sacrifice should never be forgotten.

  1. Paul Crone, ITV News

Special Report: Honours at last for Lancashire's fallen heroes of World War One

Six British soldiers from the North West who died in the trenches of Belgium during World War One have finally been buried with honours.

The remains of the men from The Lancashire Fusiliers and The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment lay undiscovered for nearly 100 years in a farmer's field near Ypres.

But a team of local archaeologists managed to track down which Lancashire regiments they belonged to, and even made sure the men would be laid to rest with full military honours.

Paul Crone has the first of two special reports:

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