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Appeal to return lost war medal to rightful owner

Anyone with information about Private Harrison or his family should call 01772 317500. Credit: United Utilities.

An online campaign has been launched to help reunite a World War One Victory Medal with the soldier’s family after it was found in a Manchester sewer.

Brothers Jason and Shaun Dullaghan were carrying out routine cleaning work on Byfield Road in Wythenshawe, when they discovered the WWI medal at the bottom of a manhole.

The search is now on to reunite the medal, inscribed with 32266 PTE W Harrison, with the family it belongs to.

The picture of the medal and appeal for information about Pte Harrison has been tweeted and shared with the hashtag #ReuniteMe.

Jason, who works for Amey on behalf of water company United Utilities, said: “We were really lucky to spot the medal when we did; another minute or so and we’d have cleared the drain and it would have been lost forever.

“At first we thought it was a coin of some sort, it wasn’t until we looked closer that we realised what it was. We know that getting the medal back to the soldier’s family 100 years after the war is a long shot but it would be nice to hand it over to the rightful owners.”

“We find all kinds of odd things in the sewers, from false teeth to stolen goods, but this is the first time we have found anything with such emotional value as this medal.

"It’s sad to think how it was lost but we’re glad to have found it now.”

– Tony Griffiths, wastewater network manager at United Utilities
  • Anyone with information about Private Harrison or his family can get in touch by calling 01772 317500.

Special Report: Paul Crone on the reburial of the six unknown soldiers in Ypres

In the second of his special reports on the unknown soldiers found in a field in Belgium Paul Crone meets those who've ensured their remains were reburied with full military honours.

Photos: courtesy of Emmanuel Brill/Jean Michel van Elslade.

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Paying respects to the unknown soldiers from WW1

Six soldiers from the North West who died in the trenches of Belgium during World War One have been buried with honours.

The remains of the men from The Lancashire Fusiliers and The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment lay undiscovered for nearly 100 years in a farmer's field near Ypres.

But a team of local archaeologists managed to track down which Lancashire regiments they belonged to.

Adam Carr, from Warrington, is a Kingsman with the Duke of Lancaster's regiment and acted as a pall bearer during the ceremony. He said their sacrifice should never be forgotten.

  1. Paul Crone, ITV News

Special Report: Honours at last for Lancashire's fallen heroes of World War One

Six British soldiers from the North West who died in the trenches of Belgium during World War One have finally been buried with honours.

The remains of the men from The Lancashire Fusiliers and The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment lay undiscovered for nearly 100 years in a farmer's field near Ypres.

But a team of local archaeologists managed to track down which Lancashire regiments they belonged to, and even made sure the men would be laid to rest with full military honours.

Paul Crone has the first of two special reports:

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Who are the North West's unidentified fallen at Ypres?

The six soldiers were laid to rest anonymously Credit: ITV

Granada Reports has travelled to Belgium to reveal the story of the bodies of six soldiers found in a farmer's field near Ypres.

The remains of uniforms and cap badges proved two of the men were from the Lancashire Fusiliers, two from The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment and the final two remain unidentified.

They have now been reburied with full military honours at Prowse Point Cemetery near Ploegsteert near Ypres but their names will likely remain a mystery.

Manchester celebrates India's contribution to the First World War

Credit: Imperial War Museum

A special event was held at the Imperial War Museum North today to commemorate the Indian contribution in World War One.

The Jullundur Brigade was made up of soldiers from the North West, who fought side by side in the trenches with Sikhs, muslims and Hindus.

100 years ago today, they stood together at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle were the brigade suffered heavy losses.

Our reporter Paul Crone has this report:

For more information on this event and many others visit the Imperial War Museum's website.

Manchester celebrates India's contribution to the First World War

India's contribution to World War One will be celebrated at the Imperial War Museum in Manchester Credit: PA

Several hundreds guests are expected to attend an event at the Imperial War Museum North to mark the Indian contribution to the First World War.

The Jullundur Brigade, which was part of the Manchester Regiment and was made up Sikhs, Muslims and Hindus fought at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle 100 years ago today. The Brigade suffered heavy losses. Military personnel, civic dignitaries and leaders from the Muslim, Hindu and Sikh faith will be present at tonight's ceremony.

This incredible archive footage was provided by the Imperial War Museum North.

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