Live updates

Special Report: Paul Crone on the reburial of the six unknown soldiers in Ypres

In the second of his special reports on the unknown soldiers found in a field in Belgium Paul Crone meets those who've ensured their remains were reburied with full military honours.

Photos: courtesy of Emmanuel Brill/Jean Michel van Elslade.

Advertisement

Paying respects to the unknown soldiers from WW1

Six soldiers from the North West who died in the trenches of Belgium during World War One have been buried with honours.

The remains of the men from The Lancashire Fusiliers and The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment lay undiscovered for nearly 100 years in a farmer's field near Ypres.

But a team of local archaeologists managed to track down which Lancashire regiments they belonged to.

Adam Carr, from Warrington, is a Kingsman with the Duke of Lancaster's regiment and acted as a pall bearer during the ceremony. He said their sacrifice should never be forgotten.

  1. Paul Crone, ITV News

Special Report: Honours at last for Lancashire's fallen heroes of World War One

Six British soldiers from the North West who died in the trenches of Belgium during World War One have finally been buried with honours.

The remains of the men from The Lancashire Fusiliers and The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment lay undiscovered for nearly 100 years in a farmer's field near Ypres.

But a team of local archaeologists managed to track down which Lancashire regiments they belonged to, and even made sure the men would be laid to rest with full military honours.

Paul Crone has the first of two special reports:

Who are the North West's unidentified fallen at Ypres?

The six soldiers were laid to rest anonymously Credit: ITV

Granada Reports has travelled to Belgium to reveal the story of the bodies of six soldiers found in a farmer's field near Ypres.

The remains of uniforms and cap badges proved two of the men were from the Lancashire Fusiliers, two from The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment and the final two remain unidentified.

They have now been reburied with full military honours at Prowse Point Cemetery near Ploegsteert near Ypres but their names will likely remain a mystery.

Advertisement

Manchester celebrates India's contribution to the First World War

Credit: Imperial War Museum

A special event was held at the Imperial War Museum North today to commemorate the Indian contribution in World War One.

The Jullundur Brigade was made up of soldiers from the North West, who fought side by side in the trenches with Sikhs, muslims and Hindus.

100 years ago today, they stood together at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle were the brigade suffered heavy losses.

Our reporter Paul Crone has this report:

For more information on this event and many others visit the Imperial War Museum's website.

Manchester celebrates India's contribution to the First World War

India's contribution to World War One will be celebrated at the Imperial War Museum in Manchester Credit: PA

Several hundreds guests are expected to attend an event at the Imperial War Museum North to mark the Indian contribution to the First World War.

The Jullundur Brigade, which was part of the Manchester Regiment and was made up Sikhs, Muslims and Hindus fought at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle 100 years ago today. The Brigade suffered heavy losses. Military personnel, civic dignitaries and leaders from the Muslim, Hindu and Sikh faith will be present at tonight's ceremony.

This incredible archive footage was provided by the Imperial War Museum North.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning - we will remember them.

Ceramic poppy tribute at Lytham school

A series of events take place across the North West today to remember those killed in the two World Wars and other conflicts . The region will fall silent at 11am - the time the guns on the Western Front stopped at the end of the First World War.

Lytham school pupils with the poppies they made

Pupils at a school in Lytham have marked the sacrifice made by former pupils in the Great War. Year 9 at AKS which was King Edward VII and Arnold School commemorated the loss of their old boys by making ceramic poppies for each life lost. Head of Art and Design Laura P. Heap planned the project after discovering 33% (73) volunteers had lost their lives.

Load more updates