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Anti-grooming campaign launches in Manchester

A new campaign to stop vulnerable people from being groomed to commit crime is being launched in Manchester later today.

'Trapped' aims to highlight how to spot signs that individuals are being targetted by criminals and how to report it.

'Trapped' campaign Credit: GMP

“Offenders use intimidation to exploit and control children and vulnerable adults to carry out criminal activity on their behalf.

“The people they are targeting are often singled out because they may have a troubled life at home, are in the care system or are being bullied and looking for protection.

“Those being subjected to these hideous crimes are victims, not criminals, and I want to reassure anybody who feels trapped that there is a way out and we will listen to what you have to say.”

– Chief Superintendent Mary Doyle

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  1. Matt O'Donoghue - Correspondent

Critics blast report for 'ignoring' ethnicity of offenders

The Coffey Report says young people are still "being preyed upon" across Greater Manchester.

But, despite the report being commissioned in the wake of the Rochdale scandal, critics say there is scant mention of on-street grooming by gangs of Asian men.

The report makes recommendations for training, education and the role parents and the community should play in future.

However, many are asking what is being done for those who have already been let down by a system that was supposed to care.

  1. Ashley Derricott - Correspondent

Calls for more community projects to help tackle abuse

One thing Ann Coffey MP highlights in her report is that the police cannot tackle child sexual exploitation alone.

She calls for for a new approach led by young people themselves.

Among the projects visited and praised by Ann Coffey MP is one in Oldham run by two sisters.

Ashley Derricott went to meet some of those on the front line in the battle against child sexual exploitation.

PM: 'Very early intervention' biggest lesson from report

Prime Minister David Cameron has said that Ann Coffey's report into child sexual exploitation is 'helpful' and 'makes some good contributions' to the debate.

But he went on to say that various agencies, such as the police and social services, need to intervene 'more quickly' to prevent the abuse of children across the country.

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PM: 'Early intervention' one of biggest lessons out of report

Prime Minister David Cameron has told a press conference that one of the biggest lessons of the Coffey Report into child sexual exploitation is very early intervention.

Addressing the media, he said that it is 'not acceptable' for people under 16 to suffer abuse.

Rochdale MP: Report 'naïve' in blaming public attitude

Rochdale MP Simon Danczuk says the report into child sexual exploitation by Ann Coffey MP has some 'useful recommendations' but is naïve in the way it blames the public for having the 'wrong attitude' towards the abuse of children.

  1. National

Whistleblower: Report 'doesn't offer concrete solutions'

The health worker responsible for gathering the main evidence in the 2012 Rochdale child sex abuse case has told ITV News Ann Coffey's report "doesn't go anywhere" to ensuring it never happens again.

Sara Rowbotham said she had "tried hard to make it clear" to the authorities that children were being sexually exploited but that "nobody did anything meaningful" to stop it.

"Ann Coffey's report doesn't go anywhere to address any of that, it doesn't go anywhere to ensuring that that's never going to happen to anybody again," the whistleblower said.

"She doesn't offer concrete solutions, she doesn't absolutely say we have zero tolerance, it doesn't go anywhere to address the injustice and the absolute terror that happened to those children in Rochdale," she added.

  1. National

Coffey: Abuse response 'shouldn't be a postcode lottery'

Stockport MP Ann Coffey, who led a report into child sexual exploitation, has said the authorities' response to abuse "shouldn't be a postcode lottery".

ITV News Granada Political Reporter Daniel Hewitt reports:

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