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Facebook response on Rigby case - 'We don't allow terrorist content'

Facebook - 'horrified' by murder Credit: PA Pictures

In a statement, a Facebook spokesman said: "Like everyone else, we were horrified by the vicious murder of Fusilier Lee Rigby. We don't comment on individual cases but Facebook's policies are clear, we do not allow terrorist content on the site and take steps to prevent people from using our service for these purposes."

The Community Standards page of the social network's website has a section dedicated to violence and threats. It says: "Safety is Facebook's top priority. We remove content and may escalate to law enforcement when we perceive a genuine risk of physical harm, or a direct threat to public safety.

"You may not credibly threaten others, or organise acts of real-world violence. Organisations with a record of terrorist or violent criminal activity are not allowed to maintain a presence on our site. We also prohibit promoting, planning or celebrating any of your actions if they have, or could, result in financial harm to others, including theft and vandalism."

– Facebook spokesperson

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Facebook hosted chat between Adebowale & extremist

Facebook hosted an exchange between Michael Adebowale and an overseas extremist ahead of the murder of Lee Rigby, ITV News understands.

In the exchange Adebowale spoke of his intent to murder a soldier.

In a statement, a spokeswoman for Facebook said they took "steps" to prevent people using the site for terrorist purposes.

Like everyone else, we were horrified by the vicious murder of Fusilier Lee Rigby.

We don’t comment on individual cases but Facebook’s policies are clear, we do not allow terrorist content on the site and take steps to prevent people from using our service for these purposes.

– Facebook spokeswoman

Rigby report nothing more than 'a distraction' says killer's brother

Jeremiah Adebolajo, brother of Michael Adebolajo, has said that the parliamentary report on the 2013 Woolwich attack is 'nothing more than a distraction.'

He said:

My brother was constantly and closely monitored by the security services.

He had almost no online presence at all, a fact that even caused the security services to request me to keep a closer eye on him.

I think the facts of the case, the lack of publicly available evidence to support the report and the convenience with which the government will now be able to expand unpopular spying laws are all testimony to the fact that this report is nothing more than a distraction from the motives behind the attack and a way to put a particular segment of British society under further pressure and surveillance.

– Jeremiah Adebolajo

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PM announces £130m boost for intelligence services

Prime Minister David Cameron has announced an extra £130 million will be given to security and intelligence agencies.

Mr Cameron said the money would be used to "enhance our ability to monitor and disrupt these self-starting terrorists".

It comes in the wake of a report by the Intelligence and Security Committee into actions by agencies in the lead up to soldier Lee Rigby's death.

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Cameron: Lessons can be learned from Rigby report

Prime Minister David Cameron has said lessons can be learned from a report into actions taken by intelligence agencies in the lead up to soldier Lee Rigby's murder.

Mr Cameron said: "There are lessons to be learned and things that need to change."

The report, by the Intelligence and Security Committee, concluded intelligence agencies could not have prevented the murder of Rigby despite his killers featuring in a total of seven error-filled operations before the attack.

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Lack of monitoring by web firms 'leaves Britain open to higher terror threat'

The Intelligence and Security Committee raised concerns about the lack of monitoring by communication service providers and warned it left the British public open to "a higher level of threat".

The Committee said none of the providers it approached as part of its investigations into agency operations before the death of soldier Lee Rigby monitored and reviewed suspicious content on their systems.

Also none of the providers regarded themselves as compelled to comply with UK warrants.

"This is of very serious concern: the capability of the agencies to access the communications of their targets is essential to their ability to detect and prevent terrorist threats in the UK," the report said.

It said the UK Government was taking action on the issues but warned: "Until it is resolved the British public are exposed to a higher level of threat."

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