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Report: More to be done over wheelchair access to North West attractions

Living everyday life in a wheelchair can be challenging enough - but how about when you fancy going to an art gallery or museum?

Well, here's some good news. Four of our region's top tourist attractions, have been named in the top 10 nationwide for having the best wheelchair access.

Other venues like Manchester's Museum of Science and Industry and Chester Zoo are in the top 50.

But as our correspondent Ann O'Connor found, that doesn't mean ''job done'':

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  1. Wales

Welsh speaking drunk in English police cell insists on interpreter

A drunken man who was arrested in Manchester demanded an interpreter after telling police he would only speak in Welsh. Officers spent four hours trying to find a Welsh language expert to deal with the man, 26, who could speak perfectly good English.

But they failed to find a translator and had to let him go without charge.

The Welsh speaker was arrested on this street for being drunk and disorderly. Credit: Google Streetview

Officers went onto Twitter to blast the "difficult and time-wasting" prisoner who was arrested at 2am for a public order offence in Sackville Street, Manchester.

Their official tweet said: "Drunk and disorderly - despite speaking English in custody, insisted on Welsh interpreter which we struggled to find.

"And no, it's not a dig at the Welsh, just frustration and feeling that someone was being difficult needlessly."

The un-named man was bailed to return to the police station when sober and he accepted an £80 fixed penalty fine - written in English.

Credit: PA

We spent several hours trying to find an interpreter for the man who has Welsh roots. He's wasted his own time and our time. At least he saw sense in the end.

– Greater Manchester Police
  1. National

Liverpool University postpones Hogan-Howe ceremony

The University of Liverpool has apologised to the Hillsborough families after deciding to postpone a ceremony to award Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe an honorary degree.

Bernard Hogan-Howe, the Metropolitan Police Commissioner. Credit: PA Wire

Hogan-Howe was referred to the Independent Police Complaints Commission in December over his role at the Hillsborough disaster in 1989 where 96 people died.

The commissioner was due to receive the award in recognition of his time as Chief Constable to Merseyside at a ceremony in December.

Campaigners said they were "appalled" by the university's "insensitivity".

“We are deeply sorry if we have inadvertently caused any distress to the Hillsborough families. All of us feel great sensitivity to the families at this difficult time,” deputy vice-chancellor Patrick Hackett said.

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Liverpool museums among the best in UK for disabled access

The Museum of Liverpool is the second most accessible attraction in the UK Credit: PA

Three of Liverpool's top visitor attractions are amongst the ten most disabled friendly in the UK.

The Museum of Liverpool came joint second with the Imperial War Museum on London, beaten only by the Tate Modern.

Also in the list are Liverpool's World Museum, which came sixth and the Walker Art Gallery, which was ninth.

All three venues are run by National Museums Liverpool.

The study into accessibility at the UK's 100 top visitor attractions, carried out by the charity Vitalise, and looked at parking, concessions and the number of staff with disability awareness training.

The Liverpool World Museum is 6th on the list of the UK's most accessible tourist attractions. Credit: PA

More fan controversy in Moscow after City draw

Vincent Kompany says it is unacceptable that CSKA Moscow seemed to have fans in the ground. Credit: Pa

In a frustrating night for City in the Russian capital they surrendered a two-goal lead to draw 2-2.

Captain Vincent Kompany claims it is "unacceptable" Manchester City had no fans at their Champions League tie at CSKA Moscow while the home side apparently did.

CSKA appeared to have around 200-300 fans backing them at a game that was officially played behind closed doors at the Khimki Arena.

European governing body UEFA ordered the stadium to be closed as punishment for persistent offences by CSKA fans, who have been found guilty of racist behaviour three times in the past year.

Despite that, 650 people were still permitted to attend and the CSKA supporters who vocally backed their team were thought to have come from within an allocation of 300 tickets set aside for sponsors.

You say 'no fans' then all of a sudden you turn up and basically the only team that hasn't got fans is Man City. So who's getting punished? Who is being done for racism? Man City or Moscow?

I don't have a problem, they'll say it's sponsors and so on and they need to give certain allocations, but why are we getting punished?

– Vincent Kompany, Manchester City Player
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