Live updates

People with mental health issues more likely to be killed

People with mental health problems are more likely to be murder or manslaughter victims Credit: PA

A new study says people with mental health problems are two and a half times more likely to be murder or manslaughter victims.

Over a three-year period, 1,496 people in England and Wales were killed in homicides, the research showed. Of these, 6% had been under the care of mental health services.

A third of the patient victims were killed by other individuals suffering from mental illness.

Professor Louis Appleby from the University of Manchester, who led the study said "Our findings show mental health providers can expect one of their patients to be a homicide victim every two years."

New app aims to keep mental health In Hand

The In Hand app has been developed at Fact in Liverpool. Credit: FACT

A group of young people from Liverpool who have helped develop a smartphone app designed to help youngsters with mental health issues.

The 'In Hand' app is the first of its kind and has been developed in response to growing concerns over mental health problems among under-18s, with one in ten now thought to be living with a diagnosable condition in the UK.

The launch of the In Hand app. Credit: FACT

Find out more about the In Hand project.

The In Hand app. Credit: FACT

Advertisement

Protest against mental health cuts

by Amy Welch
Protest march
Protest against mental health cuts Credit: Granada Reports

Hundreds of protestors have been marching through Eccles in protest at cuts to mental health services. Campaigners from Bolton, Salford and Trafford took part in the rally. They're angry at proposals to reduce the number of beds by 20 percent over the next two years.

NHS England say they've been working solidly to ensure high quality care.

Exclusive: GMP chief says police 'tied up' dealing with mental illness

by Matt O'Donoghue

The Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police says his officers are spending more and more time helping vulnerable people with mental health issues.

Sir Peter Fahy says 'it's a scandal' that officers' time is being tied up dealing with people who need psychiatric help.

Meanwhile; the families of people with mental health problems say they're now expected to do the jobs of trained professionals.

NHS England says no funding had been cut for mental health services and that a five year plan is now underway to provide greater support for mental health services.

Advertisement

Top cop says officers are "tied up" dealing with mental health problems

Greater Manchester Police Chief Constable, Sir Peter Fahy Credit: PA

The Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police says dealing with mental illness has become the number one issue for his front line officers - and the problem is getting worse.

Sir Peter Fahy said "It is a scandal that police officers are tied up and they're not available on the street to serve the public because of huge delays at A & E. Often officers are forced to spend hours waiting with patients at hospitals waiting for consultants to make a decision or find a bed."

Sir Peter Fahy says officers are having to cope with more vulnerable people Credit: PA

Despite his officers not being trained to make mental health assessments Sir Peter told Granada Reports they are being called upon to carry out the roles of professionals and that it is now taking up a huge part of police work.

Load more updates

Advertisement

Today's top stories