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NSPCC critical of local agencies for failing to protect Jai Joshi

Credit: Family video footage

The NSPCC has criticised local child protection agencies for failing to protect Jai Joshi who died in a fire deliberately started by his mother.

The four-year-old from Preston died in Liverpool last May.

In a statement the NSPCC said:

This was a tragic case with many opportunities missed by professionals to give better protection to this vulnerable four-year-old. The local safeguarding children boards must now closely monitor the agencies involved to ensure the failures identified are fully addressed.”

“Critical information about the boy and mother, including her long-standing mental health issues, was not adequately explored or considered by agencies. Professionals made decisions without knowing the full picture, which was compounded by poor record keeping. At no time was there a coordinated or coherent effort by agencies to draw together the wealth of information they each held. The lack of professional scepticism about the mother’s often conflicting accounts is deeply worrying."

– NSPCC

Report into child abuse claims - statement from Home Office this morning

Home Sec Theresa May Credit: PA

A report into how police handled sex abuse claims in the 1980's is expected to reveal it's failed to find the missing documents that prompted the inquiry

The report centres on concerns the authorities did not act on information passed to them by the then Littleborough and Saddleworth MP Geoffrey Dickens about a possible paedophile ring in Westminster.

The Home Office had previously said the so-called Dickens dossier had been destroyed. A statement is expected from the Home Office at 9.30 this morning

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NSPCC launch £1m school scheme in Greater Manchester

NSPCC appeal Credit: PA

Childre's charity the NSPCC is launching a £1m appeal to take their message into schools across the Greater Manchester.

ChildLine Founder, Esther Rantzen CBE, and John Amaechi, Psychologist, former NBA basketball star and NSPCC Ambassador, will kick off the appeal to support the NSPCC’s ChildLine Schools Service.

The aim is to raise £1 million to enable the NSPCC to deliver special school assemblies across the area by 2016, and every two years thereafter, helping nine to 11 year olds to understand abuse, give them the confidence to report it and find help.

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Lancashire police back National NSPCC campaign

Lancashire police say they're pleased to be supporting this innovative campaign which aims to raise awareness about the importance of educating children about staying safe and speaking out.

We know that for many it can be a difficult topic to broach but prevention is always better than cure and we can’t underestimate the importance of those early conversations to make children aware of the dangers.

“One of the biggest challenges in the majority of cases involving children who have been sexually exploited is that many of those involved don’t think of themselves as victims. The men groom the victims into believing they are in a relationship them.

– Det Supt Ian Critchley, Head of Public Protection for Lancashire Constabulary

NSPCC launch campaign to help parents warn children of signs of sexual abuse

Bernadette Oxley, NSPCC Regional Head of Services for North West and Cumbria says parents want advice on how to speak to their children about staying safe. She says post the Jimmy Savile and Stuart Hall cases children are asking questions and parents need to know handle them.

It's being supported by Lancashire police who say parents and carers should be aware and keep any eye out for warning signs such as changes in a child's behaviour.