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Barrow wins work on new nuclear submarines

An artist's impression of the Successor-class submarine Credit: Ministry of Defence

Submarine builders in Barrow have won contracts worth £79m, for initial work on Britain's next generation of nuclear deterrent subs.

The Ministry of Defence announced it had agreed two contracts with BAE Systems. The initial work includes structural fittings, electrical equipment, castings and forgings which must be ordered now, according to Defence Secretary Philip Hammond.

The new vessels are due to enter service by 2028.

Mr Hammond said: "The Successor programme is supporting around 2,000 jobs and up to 850 British businesses could benefit from the supply chain as we exploit the most modern technologies, and employ a significant portion of the UK's engineers, project managers and technicians over the coming years."

Admiral Sir George Zambellas, First Sea Lord, said: "The Royal Navy has been operating continuous at-sea deterrent patrols for more than 40 years and the Successor submarines will allow us to do so with cutting-edge equipment well into the future."

Both contracts, one of £47m and another of £32m, will be filled by workers in Barrow-in-Furness.

Lib Dems moot Trident alternative

HMS Victorious Credit: PA

Britain can maintain a credible nuclear deterrent without a like-for-like replacement of its Trident submarine fleet, a review by the Liberal Democrats has concluded.

The review, led by Treasury Chief Secretary Danny Alexander, said there are alternatives to the UK's current nuclear stance which requires at least one nuclear-armed submarine always to be at a sea.

However, it accepts that cutting the size of the current four-vessel fleet would not offer the same degree of resilience as the current continuous-at-sea deterrent and would not guarantee "a prompt response in all circumstances".

HMS Vanguard Credit: PA

The review was launched by Prime Minister David Cameron and Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg as part of the coalition agreement - reflecting the Lib Dems' opposition to a like-for-for like replacement for the Trident submarine fleet - which the Tories strongly support.

Mr Cameron reiterated that the review did not change current Government policy - with the key decisions on whether to go ahead not due to be taken until 2016 after the next general election.

The review concluded: "The analysis has shown that there are alternatives to Trident that would enable the UK to be capable of inflicting significant damage such that most potential adversaries around the world would be deterred."

"None of these alternative systems and postures offers the same degree of resilience as the current posture of continuous at sea deterrence, nor could they guarantee a prompt response in all circumstances."

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Lib Dems' Trident review considers nuclear alternatives

Britain can maintain a credible nuclear deterrent without a like-for-like replacement of its Trident submarine fleet, a review by the Liberal Democrats has concluded.

The review, led by Treasury Chief Secretary Danny Alexander, said there are alternatives to the UK's current nuclear stance which requires at least one nuclear-armed submarine always to be at a sea.

However, it accepts that cutting the size of the current four-vessel fleet would not offer the same degree of resilience as the current continuous-at-sea deterrent and would not guarantee "a prompt response in all circumstances".

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Alexander: Britain's security will not be compromised

Liberal Democrat Cabinet Minister Danny Alexander said the Liberal Democrats' review of alternatives to Britain's Trident nuclear deterrent will not "compromise national security".

In a move which could put his party at odds with its Conservative coalition partners, the Chief Secretary to the Treasury admitted Britain faces a "big decision in 2016" over alternatives to the current weapon system.

Read: Defence Secretary: Trident downgrade a 'huge gamble'

Read: Lord Ashdown dismisses Hammond's Trident criticism

National

Lord Ashdown dismisses Hammond's Trident criticism

Lord Ashdown has dismissed Defence Secretary Philip Hammond's criticism of downgrading Trident in light of a new review unveiling alternatives to the nuclear deterrent.

The former Liberal Democrat leader wrote on Twitter:

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#hammond on Trident. Hmmm. No doubt he would hang on to the Dreadnoughts as well in case the Germans come out of the mist again from Jultand

He added that reducing the size of the fleet would not mean a "part-time" deterrent:

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Tories: less Trident = "part time deterrents". No. The sword is still there, All the time. Just sheathed til we need it. Sensible.

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Defence Secretary: Trident downgrade a 'huge gamble'

Defence Secretary Philip Hammond with Chief of the General Staff Sir Peter Wall in a recent visit to Essex.
Defence Secretary Philip Hammond with Chief of the General Staff Sir Peter Wall in a recent visit to Essex. Credit: Chris Radburn/PA Wire/Press Association Images

Downgrading the UK's nuclear deterrent would be a "huge gamble with Britain's security", Defence Secretary Philip Hammond has declared as he rejected proposals for a "part-time" Trident force ahead of the publication of a Liberal Democrat review of the weapons system.

Mr Hammond insisted that a like-for-like replacement of all four nuclear-armed submarines when they leave service is the only way to maintain a continuous state of readiness to launch a strike.

Liberal Democrat Cabinet minister Danny Alexander's Trident Alternatives Review, which will be published today, is expected to include an array of options short of full replacement.

But Mr Hammond insisted in an interview with BBC Radio 4's Today programme that any financial savings from reducing the fleet would be "trivial".

"We have had for 45 years now a continuous-at-sea deterrent posture which has served this country very well and we do not believe that with nuclear threats.

"If anything, proliferating, with more countries seeking to get nuclear weapons, this is the time to downgrade, certainly not to go to a part-time deterrent."

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