Live updates

  1. National

Manchester Airport Group welcomes HS2 'boost'

The chief executive of Manchester Airport owner MAG, Charlie Cornish, has welcomed the news that the HS2 route will stop off at the airport.

Manchester Airport will become a more viable alternative to Heathrow under the HS2 plans, campaigners say Credit: Martin Rickett/PA Wire

"Along with the city centre station, it will provide an additional boost to the economy of the region.”

  1. National

Osborne: Economic case for HS2 'pretty compelling'

Chancellor George Osborne said HS2 will be an "engine for growth" in the North and Midlands, and will create tens of thousands of jobs.

He acknowledged that communities along its route would face a "very difficult" disruption to their lives, but said the economic benefits were "pretty compelling". He told BBC Breakfast:

I think it is the engine for growth in the North and the Midlands of this country. I think it is going to create tens of thousands of jobs in Manchester and across our great cities.

In the end, as a country, you have got to make those long-term choices. If our predecessors hadn't decided to build the railways in the Victorian times or the motorways in the middle part of the 20th century, then we wouldn't have those things today.

– Chancellor George Osborne

Advertisement

  1. National

Stansted sold to Manchester Airports group for £1.5bn

An aeroplane on the tarmac at Stansted Airport, which is being sold to a rival group. Credit: PA

The company formerly known as BAA is to sell Stansted airport to the Manchester Airports group for £1.5 billion.

The deal, announced late this evening, will mean that BAA - now known as Heathrow Airport Holdings - will be responsible for just four UK airports compared with its original seven.

The remaining ones are Heathrow, Southampton, Aberdeen and Glasgow.

Councillors vote to bulldoze bus station

Preston bus station. Credit: ITV Granada

Preston bus station could be demolished after councillors in the city voted in principle to tear it down.

But before it is bulldozed, they want another report on the cost of saving it.

It costs the city council around £300,000 a year to keep it running, which it says it can no longer afford.

An initial report by Lancashire County Council found refurbishing it would cost between £17m and £23m.

Now the city council will appoint its own consultants to get another estimate for refurbishment.

Advertisement

Load more updates