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  1. Daniel Hewitt, Reporter

Likely to be Friday 'at the earliest' before United Utilities ends boil water notice

Residents in parts of Lancashire are still being told to boil their water Credit: ITV Granada

United Utilities say it is unlikely to lift its boil water notice until Friday, nine days after the company found traces of cryptosporidium in its water supply.

Around 300,000 residents in Lancashire are still being told to boil tap water before drinking it, preparing food and brushing teeth.

United Utilities told Granada Reports the situation is now 'in the hands of the scientists' at its laboratory in Warrington where tests of water samples for the water-based parasite are taking place around the clock.

On Monday, the company said one clear sample had been found overnight and it was hoped water would be safe to drink from the tap again by Wednesday this week.

To lift the boil water notice, scientists need to find three negative samples within 24 hours.

However today we are told small traces of cryptospordium remain in the water supply, and the current situation is unlikely to be resolved before the end of the working week.

Until that time, the boil water notice remains in place as a 'precaution' and the company insists the risk remains low and is 'getting lower'.

You can't flush this...

New research has shown that people in the North West have thrown £62 million down the drain by flushing the wrong things down the toilet.

The study suggests that one in 10 people in the region has blocked their toilet by flushing away items such as toilet wipes, baby wipes and cotton buds - paying an average of £99 for a plumber to repair it. Across the region’s 5.7m adult population, this equates to some £62 million.

United Utilities commissioned the study to alert householders to this growing, and expensive, problem. To help get their message across, they have produced a video called 'You Can't Flush This', - spoofing the classic MC Hammer hit.

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Drowning victim's mum speaks out on safety video

The mother of a teenage boy who drowned last year in Chorley has been speaking to Granada Reports as a new water safety video is released.

Rebecca Ramsay's son Dylan drowned at Hill Top Quarry in July 2011.

She has been speaking to reporter Amy Welch on how her life has changed and why she thinks more should be done to prevent other parents experiencing the same tragedy.

Emergency services back film to tackle swim tragedies

A hard-hitting film has been launched today to warn North West teenagers about the potentially fatal consequences of swimming in reservoirs and other forms of open water such as quarries.

The 'Not a Game' film from water company United Utilities is backed by the region's emergency services.

Shot from the perspective of a teenage boy who decides to swim at a local reservoir, the film uses video gaming style graphics to accompany actions as they unfold on screen, culminating in images which show him getting into difficulties and drowning.

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