Live updates

Treating mental issues in new mums 'cost effective'

It is more "cost effective" to treat new mums with mental health issues than to ignore faults in the system, Good Morning Britain's medical expert said.

Dr Hilary Jones said "hundreds of thousands" of pregnancies were effected by post-natal depression and psychosis, which had "long-term repercussions" for mother, baby and immediate family.

British nurse who survived Ebola returns to Sierra Leone

William Pooley. Credit: PA Wire

The British nurse who survived Ebola after contracting the virus in Sierra Leone has returned to the West African country to continue treat others who are infected.

William Pooley, 29, said he was delighted to be back in the country and would attempt to prevent "as many unnecessary deaths as possible".

The 29-year-old, who was the first confirmed Briton to contract Ebola and was flown back to UK for treatment in August, arrived in the capital Freetown on Sunday.

He will now resume work in an Ebola isolation unit run by UK medical staff.

Mr Pooley said: "The real emergency is in West Africa, and the teams out there need all the support we can give them.

"I am now looking forward to getting back out there and doing all I can to prevent as many unnecessary deaths as possible."

Advertisement

UK family 'stockpiles food and gas' in case of Ebola

A family of six takes the threat of a "handful of cases" of Ebola in the UK so seriously they have stockpiled a year's worth of supplies should the worst happen.

Despite the rare chance of a full scale Ebola outbreak in the UK over the coming months, but the Tiler family are taking no chances.

The Bradford based family of six have already collected long-life food, water, candles, toilet roll and even bottles of gas for a stove in case there is a widespread Ebola outbreak across the UK.

Mum Emma and Dad Chris already have their four children trained to put on military suits and gas masks in case the hemorrhagic fever spreads across the country.

Chris Tiler admitted the family "worried about it quite a lot" and accused the government of "not taking it seriously enough".

Emma told Good Morning Britain:

It's definitely not over the top. It's better to have more than not have enough. If there were riots in the streets and you couldn't go outdoors and couldn't go out and get anything, then you've got something saved.

– Emma Tiler

Concerns over mental health care for new mothers

Reports raises concerns over maternity mental health costs. Credit: PA Wire

The cost of mental health problems among pregnant women and shortly after birth runs into billions, according to a new report.

The report by the London School of Economics and Centre for Mental Health says treatment is "patchy" and that the cost is more than £8 billion a year.

It recommends spending £337m a year would improve the care for mothers during pregnancy and the first year after childbirth.

The report, due to be launched in Parliament, is part of the "Everyone's Business" campaign led by the Maternal Mental Health Alliance (MMHA) and funded by Comic Relief.

It states that nearly three quarters of the costs of treating depression, anxiety and psychosis relate to impacts on the child rather than the mother.

Dealing with the problems costs the NHS around £1.2 billion, the report said, with other costs including loss of earnings.

Around half of the cases of depression and anxiety during the perinatal period are not detected, it states.

Civil service staff to get equal parental leave pay

Equal parental leave pay for Civil Service staff Credit: PA Wire

Male and female Civil Service staff will be offered equal parental pay and support from 2015, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg is to announce this week.

Currently only mothers are offered full pay when a couple choose to share parental leave.

It comes after the Government announced last year that from April 2015 parents will have the choice over how they split parental leave entitlement.

But there was no onus on employers offering occupational maternity schemes above and beyond that to do so on an equal basis.

It is hoped the move at the Civil Service, also to come in next April, will encourage other public and private sector organisations to follow.

US to create 30-member Ebola response team

U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has ordered the creation of a 30-member expeditionary medical support team to provide emergency help in a U.S. domestic Ebola response, a Pentagon spokesman has said.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered the creation of the new team. Credit: Reuters

The team of five doctors, 20 nurses and five trainers could respond on short notice to help civilian medical professionals, spokesman Rear Admiral John Kirby said.

The team will not be deployed to West Africa or elsewhere overseas.

Advertisement

Spain to let US use air bases to help Ebola effort

The United States will use two Spanish military bases to help in its efforts to fight the Ebola outbreak in west Africa.

A statement from Spain's Defence Ministry said the US will use the bases in the south-west of the country to transport personnel and equipment to and from the affected region.

Defence Minister Pedro Morenes agreed the deal with his US counterpart Chuck Hagel in Washington.

Labour to force Commons vote on Lord Freud

Lord Freud's comments on disabled people sparked outrage last week. Credit: PA Wire

Labour will force a Commons vote on Lord Freud's future after David Cameron refused to dismiss him for his controversial suggestion that some disabled workers were "not worth" the minimum wage.

The Conservative peer has kept his job after apologising for the comment, which sparked furore among disability charities and was branded "offensive" by deputy prime minister Nick Clegg.

But Labour has made repeated calls for him to go and will table a motion of no confidence in the welfare minister tomorrow ahead of a vote later this month.

The move came as it emerged that Andrew Selous, a justice minister, told a fringe meeting at the Tory party conference that "disabled people work harder because they're grateful to have a job", according to the Independent.

Load more updates