1. ITV Report

Henry Moore sculpture to be sold

Draped Seated Woman Photo:

Tower Hamlets council has approved the sale of a Henry Moore sculpture worth millions of pounds.

The Mayor of the Borough announced the sale last month to cope with budget cuts.

Campaigners didn't want it falling into the hands of private owners.

Watch Charlotte Grant's report below:

Draped Seated Woman
  • Get more information on this story from the ITV Calendar website. The sculpture is currently on show in Yorkshire.

The Museum of London supports many peoples concern about selling great works of art such as this sculpture and wishes to be considered as a permanent home for the piece.

In a statement museum bosses said they believe that displaying Draped Seated Woman where visitors can enjoy the artwork freely and easily, will bring great public good for Londoners and visitors to the capital.

"The Museum of London's offer to put Draped Seated Woman on free, public display would enable everyone to enjoy and derive meaning from this significant artwork. As Henry Moores daughter Mary said in her letter to the Observer, this art work was created with the belief that everyone, whatever their background, should have access to works of art of the highest quality. I firmly support this idea."

– Sharon Ament, Director of the Museum of London

What do we know about Henry Moore?

  • He was born in Castleford in 1898, the seventh child of a coal miner from Lincolnshire.
  • He went to Leeds School of Art before winning a scholarship to the Royal College of Art in London.
  • He insisted on carving his sculptures and leaving the imperfections on the finished article - which was both unconventional and upsetting to his professors.
  • He later went on to cast his work in bronze.
  • In the 1930s he was considered the voice of British Sculpture.
  • He has influenced artists around the world ever since.

More on this story

  • Row over Moore sculpture

    Henry Moore sculpture, Draped Seated Woman, created for public display, is now likely to end up in an auction room with a £20m price tag.