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Quirky designs on display at Clerkenwell exhibition

There are an array of designs for people to view in Clerkenwell Photo:

A car of the future, a swing at your dinner table and a garden shed where no one can hear you tinker.

Just some of the inventions on show at a three-day festival of design, which has opened today in Clerkenwell.

A swing in place of chairs at the dinner table is just one of the quirky offerings on display

Swinging London is in Clerkenwell this week, the little village in EC1 has an identity formed centuries ago around the printing and bookbinding crafts. Today it houses artisans and designers from every field all exhibiting in the buildings ancient and almost modern.

Swinging London is in Clerkenwell this week, the little village in EC1 has an identity formed centuries ago

The reason that Clerkenwell grew up in EC1 is its proximity to Smithfield Meat Market.

The glue used for binding books and later for sticking architectural plans and furniture was made from animal bones boiled down.

The reason that Clerkenwell grew up in EC1 is its proximity to Smithfield Meat Market

"So what you've got now is an array of furniture brands or architectural practices. But also marketing, PR companies, any creative company within the industry seems to be attracted to Clerkenwell."

– Daren Newton, Co-founder, Clerkenwell Design Week

Handmade objects of beauty need careful marketing to drag the rich away from expensive tat to bespoke pieces.

Freya Sewell sits inside her 'pod' of felt that can be transported anywhere to 'escape the world'

Everything in Freya Sewell's world is made from wool felt, even her iPad nestles inside its protective coat.

"The idea is wherever you are, whether it is a library, an office, you can just get inside, close it and the felt has an incredible insulating property and it really deadens the sound. So you are completely separate."

– Freya Sewell
The exhibition is being held in what were police cells during Dickens London

They are both exhibiting in what were once cells which housed the pickpockets and streetwalkers of Dickens London.

Claire Norgross designed the iconic Habitat lampshades

Other designers bring life to the Farmiloe Building, once a glass factory now showing students impressions of the next Jaguar car.

The lights are designed by one of Clerkenwell's most commercially successful residents Claire Norgross who designed the iconic Habitat lampshades.

The exhibition will close at the end of play on Friday

The exhibition ends at close of play on Friday.