Unions and transport bosses argue over impact of tube strike

Passengers wait at a taxi rank at Victoria Station, amidst chaos on the tube. Photo: Nick Ansell/PA Wire

Millions of London commuters faced a frustrating journey to work as the two sides in the tube dispute argued over the impact today's underground strike.

RMT boss Bob Crow claimed: "The action is rock solid this morning and has reduced the network to a skeleton service with only a few ghost trains running through closed stations."

But London Underground said two thirds of its stations were open and almost a third of all trains were running.

Passengers struggled to board mainline commuter trains from overcrowded platforms at suburban rail stations and there were long queues at bus stops at the capitals main stations.

Tube bosses suffered an early setback when their plans to run a limited service on the Bakerloo line came to nothing.

But there was a better than expected service on a number of lines including the Central, Victoria and Jubilee.

Many workers chose to walk or cycle. Traffic was slow-moving on main routes into London.

London mayor Boris Johnson urged the unions to abandon the strike and return to negotiations over the proposed ticket office closures and job losses.

Mr Johnson said: "A deal is there to be done. I am more than happy to meet them to discuss the ticket office closures."