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ITV News' Ria Chatterjee on the moped crash live on air that went viral

Photo: ITV News

Checking the facts of the story. Putting your ear piece in properly. Making sure the sound levels are okay. Calming the butterflies in your stomach. These are the things you can control before a live broadcast. The rest is left to chance.

Credit: ITV News

I was about thirty seconds into my live about the Eurostar and Eurotunnel chaos when I heard a loud bang. I felt my heart leap. Any reporter knows that a sudden distraction in the middle of a live monologue can end in a jumbled mess of words and a sheepish throw back to the studio. However, I knew I didn't have much left to say so I persisted and calmly threw back to the presenter.

Credit: ITV News

Within seconds of uttering "Nina" and hearing her move onto the next story, I swivelled around to see a small commotion on the road behind me. The cameraman filled me in: there'd been a collision between a motorist and a pedestrian. From what I could see, the pedestrian was walking around and the motorcyclist was picking up his scooter. After about five minutes the scene was completely clear. No trace of an accident on the road, but the moment, committed to film, now going viral on social media.

People were tweeting me asking after the two people who had been involved in the accident, some said I'd been very professional in carrying on with the live and a few asked why I hadn't turned around and mentioned what was happening. In answer to that last point: it's difficult to offer an accurate account of something that's only just happened and, of course, something you didn't actually see.

Such is the nature of live news. I was glad to see the two men involved in the accident carry on with their evening. I'm not sure exactly how many live broadcasts I've done in my career. But, I'm quite certain that was the most memorable one yet.