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  1. ITV Report

Fabric nightclub to appeal licence revocation

Fabric is one of London's biggest nightclubs and faces closure Credit: PA

One of London's biggest nightclubs will appeal against the council's decision to revoke its licence, it has been confirmed.

Fabric nightclub in Farringdon faces closure after Islington Council found there was a "culture of drug use" which staff could not control.

A spokesman for the venue confirmed that it had decided to appeal against the decision, which was announced on Wednesday.

The closure of the club has been met with fierce criticism from politicians and musicians alike, who say that as a London institution, every effort should be made to keep it open.

Mayor Sadiq Khan expressed disappointment over it shutting and that an agreement had not been reached between Fabric, the Metropolitan Police and Islington Council.

"I am committed to using the influence of my office to overcome the numerous challenges facing the nighttime economy," he said in August, adding that he had little power to challenge the licensing decision directly.

Fans of the nightclub left flowers at the scene Credit: PA

DJ Goldie threatened to melt down his MBE in protest at the move, and Saul Milton - one half of duo Chase & Status - branded the council's decision "madness".

Over 150,000 people signed a petition asking for the club to remain open.

The club was forced to close temporarily after the deaths of two teenagers from suspected drug overdoses earlier this year, and in August the Met applied to the council for the licence to be reviewed.

Following the announcement, the club said that shutting the venue was "not the answer to drug-related problems" and that it set "a troubling precedent" for the capital's night life.

A spokesman for Islington Council said: "The problems seen during the 2014 review of Fabric's licence have not been adequately addressed, which has resulted in further tragedy and crime.

"In light of all the circumstances, the sub-committee decided that revocation was both appropriate and proportionate."

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