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London's first underground hotel plan slammed for treating guests like 'troglodytes in a cave'

Underground hotel 'would treat guests like troglodytes' Credit: Ian Chalk Architects

London's first underground hotel plan has been criticised for treating guests like 'troglodytes in a cave' in a claim made about its proposal.

Permission has been granted for the "Subterranean Hotel" to be built in the West End.

The 166-room windowless hotel would fifty feet below the streets of Bloomsbury.

Underground hotel 'would treat guests like troglodytes'. Credit: Ian Chalk Architects

The Bloomsbury Association said the development would set a "sad precedent".

It could damage local businesses and the local economy.

It will also place unnecessary pressures on the quality of life and well being of adjoining residents.

It sets a sad precedent for the expansion of London's tourist economy taking precedence over the well being of its residents.

– The Bloomsbury Association speaking to the Telegraph
Underground hotel 'would treat guests like troglodytes'. Credit: Ian Chalk Architects

Glenys Roberts, a councillor in Soho, said that the plan would mean tourists would be treated "like a bunch of troglodytes in an underground cave".

Underground hotel 'would treat guests like troglodytes'. Credit: Ian Chalk Architects

Soho Councillor Glenys Roberts said that tourists and visitors would be treated "like a bunch of troglodytes in an underground cave", adding the project was “letting down the West End."

Underground hotel 'would treat guests like troglodytes'. Credit: Ian Chalk Architects

Whether you stay in a penthouse overlooking the city or in a windowless room, people come to London to get out and about. Not to spend all their time in the hotel.

I think we are providing the best use of limited space to give people great access to Central London

– Katy Walker, from Criterion Capital
Underground hotel 'would treat guests like troglodytes'. Credit: Ian Chalk Architects

Speaking to the Telegraph, Katy Walker from Criterion Capital: "If it’s exciting and novel, people will want to stay there."