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Part of monster 130-tonne fatberg to go on display at Museum of London

Visitors to the museum will be able to marvel at part of the fatberg from early 2018. Credit: Thames Water/Museum of London

Part of the monster "fatberg" discovered in sewers beneath London is to go on display in a museum.

A section of the 130-tonne congealed mass of fat, oil, wet-wipes and other sanitary products, which was lodged in a sewer four metres underground, will make a "fascinating and disgusting" exhibit at the Museum of London, in early 2018.

The fatberg weighed more than 11 double-decker buses. Credit: Thames Water/Museum of London

The display is intended to show the history of the capital though what its people flush away, with the greasiness of the fatberg reflecting the increasingly fatty diet of Londoners.

The Victorian sewers of London were not designed to cope with the increasing levels of fat, nor with the mass of baby wipes and sanitary products inside the fatberg, the museum added.

The fatberg was long enough to reach across Tower Bridge. Credit: Thames Water/Museum of London

The fatberg - which was long enough to reach across Tower Bridge and weighed the same as 11 double-decker buses - was finally removed from sewers under Whitechapel in east London following a nine-week battle in which workers were forced to abandon machinery for hand shovels while dismantling it.

After it was broken into pieces it was then extracted from sewers using a large hose.

Water was then drained off it, leaving a hard "crust", and it is this shoebox-sized crust which will be displayed at the museum.

The rest of the fatberg will be converted into biodiesel.

Workers had to dismantle the fatberg by hand. Credit: Thames Water/Museum of London

"There is definitely something repulsively human about this modern-day monster we helped create - largely through our own excess," said Stuart White, a spokesperson for Thames Water.

"This rock-solid chunk in the museum is a vivid reminder to us all that out of sight is not gone forever, so please help keep London flowing - don't feed the fatberg."

The fatberg was a congealed mass of fat, oil, wet-wipes and other sanitary products Credit: Thames Water/Museum of London