Vauxhall helicopter crash

A funeral was held today for the pilot who died in last month's helicopter crash in Vauxhall.

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Helicopter pilot's final words revealed

The final words of the pilot, who was killed in last week's helicopter crash, were revealed today.

Pete Barnes thanked an air traffic controller for clearing him to divert to Battersea Heliport in thick fog.

Seconds later, he hit a crane on top of a building in Vauxhall and crashed to the road below, the wreckage killing a pedestrian.

Paul Brand reports.

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Helicopter crash pilot gave no radio warning before crash

Captain Pete Barnes was killed after his helicopter struck a crane.

A report by the Air Accidents Investigation Branch into the Vauxhall helicopter crash has revealed the pilot gave no warning that he was about to crash.

Pete Barnes spoke to air traffic control, asking to land at the Heliport in Battersea: "If I could head to Battersea that would be very useful."

Air traffic control replied: "Battersea diversion approved, you're cleared to Battersea."

Mr Barnes' final words were: "Thanks a lot."

Seconds later, his helicopter struck the crane.

Mr Barnes and a pedestrian Matthew Wood were killed when the helicopter came down onto the street.

Inquest told pilot was diverted in bad weather

Pete Barnes, who was 50, died when he flew his helicopter into a high-rise crane Credit: Facebook

The pilot who died in a helicopter crash had been diverted because of bad weather before his aircraft clipped a crane, an inquest has heard. Pete Barnes died from multiple injuries after his helicopter hit a high-rise crane on The Tower at St George Wharf in Vauxhall and crashed into Wandsworth Road

Mr Barnes, a father of two, had been flying from Redhill Aerodrome in Surrey to Elstree in Hertfordshire but was diverted to Battersea heliport due to the bad weather, Southwark Coroner's Court heard. He was flying a twin-engine Agusta Westland 109 helicopter.

London Inner South Coroner Andrew Harris said he would review the case in three months and did not set a date for a future hearing.

The veteran pilot, who had 25 years' experience, had flown as an air ambulance pilot and in several films during his career including Oscar-winning Saving Private Ryan

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