Heathrow squatters lose appeal

Squatters who set up a community garden project on private land close to Heathrow Airport have failed to overturn a High Court ruling.

Heathrow squatters fight for 'eco-community'

Transition Heathrow, a project which first occupied the misused land in the Heathrow village of Sipson in March 2010, has been arguing its case in court for over two years.

However, it lost its High Court battle today. Campaigners have vowed to take the appeal to the Supreme Court.

Grassroots community Transition Heathrow lost their bid at the High Court today. Credit: Transition Heathrow
Grow Heathrow', a squatted community garden located on the proposed third runway of Heathrow airport. Credit: Transition Heathrow

Heathrow squatters to appeal to Supreme Court

Squatters who set up a community garden project on private land close to Heathrow Airport have said they will appeal to the Supreme Court, after losing a High Court bid today.

According to a statement on Transition Heathrow, they have said:

On the plus side, one of the judges found that squatters as well as tenants are entitled to respect for their home under article 8 of The European Convention on Human Rights and that the court should consider the individual circumstances of those affected when deciding how soon to make an eviction.

We are now working with our lawyers on a further appeal to the Supreme Court to define the arguments about whether article 8 is relevant to private land owners.

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Heathrow squatters vow to remain despite losing bid

Squatters who set up a community garden project on private land close to Heathrow Airport.

Squatters who set up a community garden project on private land close to Heathrow Airport have failed to overturn a High Court ruling.

In a statement today, members said:

"We’ve just heard that we lost our appeal in the UK’s second-highest court so the landowner now has a live possession order that can be enforced. We don’t know the landowner’s plans, so we don’t know whether or when he might choose to hire bailiffs, but he now has the power to.

"We are continuing to try to negotiate with the landowner to buy the land, and we haven’t heard anything concrete about bailiffs, but we need to plan for the worst.

"Oh, and one more thing: we’re not going anywhere".