Plans to end cash fares on buses

Transport for London (TfL) has launched a public consultation seeking customers' views on proposals to stop cash fare payments on London buses in 2014.

Live updates

Advertisement

Bus driver gives 'thumbs up' to axing bus cash fares

A bus driver has welcomed news that Transport for London proposes to axe cash fare payments on buses.

Writing on the ITV London Facebook page:

Speaking as a London night bus driver, this idea has been floated around before, but now, it looks like the tide is turning, I do hope it is brought in, it will make things a lot easier esp. when Joe Public boards his bus and all he has is a £20.00 note, we are NOT given a float, but we ARE expected to give change. (work that one out), so I say, and I can give a HUGE thumbs up from drivers, BRING IT ON!

– Jim Bunce

Cashless bus fares 'would reduce crime on drivers'

Proposals by Transport for London to end cash fare payments on the capital's buses has received mixed reviews on the ITV London Facebook page.

Here are some of your views:

We'll have more chancers trying it on. People outside London would expect to pay with cash for the bus, regardless if it's more expensive or not. Contactless cards (which I don't have) will relieve the problem, but is not mass market yet.

– Martin Phillp

I think its a good idea, , The people who say what happens if I don't have enough money on card.etc etc!!!!?? . With microchip technology if you register your bank details (same as with congestion charge) it could be automatically deducted... It would reduce crime on the bus drivers

– Lisa Ramsey

Long as they still have those payment machines at the bus stops don't see the problem. More safety for the driver

– Sarah Mulroe

Did you know: Key facts about London's buses

Key facts about London's buses Credit: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire

Transport for London figures reveal:

  • London Buses manages one of the largest bus networks in the world.
  • Approximately 7,500 iconic red buses carry more than six million passengers each weekday on a network serving all parts of Greater London.
  • 1% is 60,000 people a day. Enough people to fill the Emirates stadium to capacity.

TfL addresses benefits of cashless bus fares

Cash fare payments on London buses look set to be phased out, but new measures are set to be introduced to help passengers with Oyster cards.

According to Transport for London, the benefits are:

  • Allow passengers to make one more bus journey if there are insufficient funds on their Oyster card - just to get them home.
  • Passengers would then pay for this extra journey when they top up their card.

Advertisement

Accepting cash fares on buses 'cost TfL £24m'

Savings made by axing cash fare payments on London's buses can be reinvested into the capital's transport network, the Managing Director for Transport for London Surface Transport said today.

Leon Daniels added:

The proposals we are consulting on reflect the changing way that our customers pay for their journeys – with the vast majority now benefiting from the best possible fares and the convenience that Oyster and contactless payment cards deliver.

It costs £24 million a year to accept cash on buses and with so few customers paying cash it makes sense for us to consider removing it.

The savings made can then be invested into making further vital improvements to the capital’s transport network.

Your views on TfL proposals to end cash fares on buses

Proposals by Transport for London to end cash fare payments on the capital's buses has received mixed reviews on the ITV London Facebook page.

Here are some of your views:

I think it's a very good idea, as long as they work out how to ensure that fare-dodging is kept to a minimum.

– Karen Stambrovskis

I dont think thats fair at all. I dont live in London but when I do go I dont always remember my oyster card. Paying with change is handy if you've forgotten.

– Louise Emerson

Public transport should remain readily available to everyone.

– Peter Kelly P

TfL claims fewer than 1% of bus fares paid in cash

Transport for London (TfL) have launched a consultation to seek customers' views on ending cash fare payments on the capital's buses.

According to the company's figures:

  • Fewer than 1% of bus fares are now paid in cash
  • Oyster pay as you go and contactless payment cards offer cheaper fares - currently paying £1 less than cash fare
  • Faster boarding times and savings generated for reinvestment in the transport network

TfL seeks consultation on ending cash fares on buses

Transport for London (TfL) has launched a public consultation seeking customers' views on proposals to stop cash fare payments on London buses in 2014.

TfL seeks consultation on ending cash fares on buses. Credit: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

According to figures, the majority of cash paying passengers tend to be aged between 16 and 34, with 80% of all passengers using cash doing so because they have insufficient funds on their Oyster card.

The proposal is being considered in order to speed up boarding times at bus stops and reduce delays.

Back to top