Commuters to face rail fare hikes up to 5.5%

Rail passengers will see the average price of their tickets increase by 3.5% from January, according to figures out today.

The current formula also allows rail companies to increase some fares by an extra 2%, meaning that some tickets could increase by 5.5%.

Fares can be increased in January by 1% plus July's Retail Prices Index inflation figure.

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  1. National

Train tickets could be '5.6% more expensive next year'

The Retail Prices Index figure for July, released today, will determine by how much fares will rise in 2015 Credit: PA

The cost of some train tickets could be almost 6% higher next year.

Rail commuters will be paying close attention to the announcement of last month's Retail Prices Index (RPI) figure today, as it will be used to calculate increases to next year's regulated fares, including season tickets.

Ticket price rises are capped at 1% plus the July RPI figure, expected to be around 2.6%.

Train companies can add another 2% to some fares, as long as the overall average remains as per the formula.

Campaigners say ticket prices are rising four times faster than the average wage and that the measurement used to calculate fare increases has been discredited.

  1. National

Rail fare rise a 'kick in the teeth' for passengers

The RMT union, which campaigns for the railways to return to public ownership, has said that next year's fare rise is a "kick in the teeth" for rail passengers.

With the “flex” rule passengers are facing fare increases of up to 5.5% at a time when wages are stagnating. People will simply be priced off the railways while the greedy train operating companies are laughing all the way to the bank. This is a kick in the teeth for the millions of British people who use our trains ... With Northern Rail already axing off-peak tickets, with others set to follow, we are once again ratcheting up the highest rail fares in Europe to travel on some of the most clapped-out and overcrowded services ...

– Mick Cash, RMT Acting General Secretary
  1. National

Rail travel 'out of the reach of ordinary people'

Rail travel is being pushed "out the reach of some ordinary people" by fare increases, the head of a public transport advocacy group said.

Stephen Joseph, executive director of the Campaign for Better Transport, told Good Morning Britain that Government-dictated ticket price hikes mean rail fares are rising four times faster than wages.

Commuters will find out how much rail fares are likely to rise by next year when the Retail Price Index (RPI) for last month is released today.

The annual increase is capped at July's RPI plus 1%, with an extra 2% added to some tickets.

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