Metropolitan Police pledge Stop and Search reform

The Metropolitan Police Service has pledged to publish data on all outcomes of controversial stop and search measures by its officers under a new Home Office scheme. The force has signed up to the Best Use of Stop and Search code of conduct previously announced by Home Secretary Theresa May, who has admitted the power was being misused.

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Over a quarter of searches had 'no reasonable grounds for suspicion'

More than 250,000 of the one million searches conducted last year could have been illegal Credit: John Stillwell/PA Wire

The Metropolitan Police Service, which employs more than 31,000 officers, has signed up to the Best Use of Stop and Search code of conduct previously announced by Home Secretary Theresa May, who has admitted the power was being misused.

The changes are being brought in after Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary found that 27% of stop and searches did not contain reasonable grounds for suspicion, meaning more than 250,000 of the one million searches conducted last year could have been illegal.

In addition, black and minority ethnic members of the public were up to six times more likely to be searched than white people.

Under the scheme, forces who sign up voluntarily will agree to more limits on blanket Section 60 stops, used on the anticipation of serious violence without suspicion a person is carrying weapons, while better records will be kept of each instance and published online.

The Met said it was introducing those two elements of the new plan from today and comes after Section 60 searches were used as a tactic in combating violent crime at this year's Notting Hill Carnival.

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