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More tests in Brecon Beacons soldier death probe

Further tests will be carried out concerning the deaths of two soldiers - including one who lived in London - during SAS selection training in the Brecon Beacons.

The men had been on a training exercise in the Brecon Beacons. Credit: Barry Batchelor/PA Wire

Edward John Maher and Lance Corporal Craig John Roberts collapsed on one of the hottest days of the year while climbing south Wales' highest mountain.

An inquest at Brecon Law Courts in Powys, mid Wales, gave the medical deaths of the pair as "unascertained".

Brecon reservist 'died in pursuit of his dream'

A reservist who died alongside a colleague during an assessment for the Territorial Army's SAS section on the hottest day of the year was pursuing his dream, his family said today. Lance Corporal Craig Roberts died during a military exercise in the Brecon Beacons on Saturday.

In a statement issued through the Ministry of Defence today, Mr Roberts's father Kelvin said:

We are all devastated at the loss of our beloved Craig; this has left a massive hole in all our lives.

We wholeheartedly supported Craig in his military endeavours and it gives us some comfort, though great sadness, that he died in the pursuit of his dream.

Next month Craig was due to start a new post in the office of the Secretary of State for Education and we were all very proud of him.

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School holds special assembly for Brecon teacher

Staff and students at the school in which a reservist, who died over the weekend during a Territorial army assessment, have held a special assembly in memory of Lance Corporal Craig Roberts.

In a statement, Trinity College in Lewisham said:

The staff and pupils of Trinity School, Lewisham have been greatly sadden by the news of the tragic death Craig Roberts.

For the past two years Craig worked at Trinity as a teaching assistant and had become a much loved member of the Trinity community.

He showed dedication, commitment and great care for young people. In addition to his duties in lessons Craig ran a fitness club, taught Saturday morning revision sessions and helped lead residential trips.

He was very committed to the common life of the school. Craig was proud of his military commitment and communicated that pride to Trinity pupils.

We are pleased that Craig was able to be such a significant part of our community. We pray for him and for his family at this terrible time.

Military to support parents of Brecon Beacons reservist

The parents of a south east London reservist who died alongside a colleague during an assessment for the Territorial Army's section of the SAS at the weekend, have paid tribute to him today.

Lance Corporal Craig Roberts' parents Kelvin and Margaret were said to be heartbroken at their son's death. Mr Roberts told the Daily Mail:

We are being given the support of the military and anything we want to say will come through them.

Tributes paid to soldier who died in Brecon Beacons

Tributes have poured in for part-time soldier Lance Corporal Craig Roberts from Lewisham described as a "true gentleman" who died during a military training exercise on one of the hottest days of the year.

Friends of Mr Roberts, a maths teacher originally from Penrhyn Bay near Llandudno in North Wales, took to social media to pay homage to a man described as a "caring, genuine guy".

Absolutely devastated by the news of Craig. He was one of my closest friends growing up, had so many good times together.

He was honestly one of the most genuine and caring guys I have ever met. R.I.P Craig. You'll never be forgotten, thoughts are with your family. I'll miss you buddy."

– Leighton Parry

RIP pal...you were one in a million.. forever in my heart.

– Dan Jones

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Training pushes soldiers 'to the edge of their endurance'

James Hopkinson, a former instructor at the Infantry Battle School in Brecon, has described the challenging conditions that the two soldiers who died would have been up against.

He said that military exercises in the Brecon Beacons were designed to push soldiers "to the edge of their endurance," but that measures would "undoubtedly" have been put in place to mitigate the effects of the hot weather.

He added that while the exact circumstances of the deaths remain unclear, such endurance training is needed to make the British Army "the best in the world".