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Paedophile's sentence increased for separate charges

Judge Peters has said that the increase to Neil Wilson's sentence is not to do with his activity with his 13-year-old victim, but to separate charges relating to images of child abuse found on his computer.

Speaking to Wilson who appeared via video link the judge said:

I have had the matter listed before me today as part of the sentence, not that part relating to sexual activity with a child, requires correcting.

It was not appreciated by the parties that I could not pass a community order with a supervision requirement for three years to run alongside a suspended sentence on the same indictment or indeed another indictment sentenced on the same occasion.

In amending the sentence I have sought to ensure that all parts of the order will be complied with by the defendant and that any breach will be brought before a court and consideration given to further penalty, including immediate imprisonment.

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Paedophile's sentence increased

A paedophile who was given a suspended sentence after his 13-year-old victim was branded "predatory" by a prosecutor has had his sentence increased due to a technicality, but has still walked free from court.

Neil Wilson was given an eight-month suspended sentence after admitting engaging in sexual activity with the girl, as well as separate counts of making indecent images, at Snaresbrook Crown Court last week.

Making no reference to the storm surrounding the case during the 10-minute hearing, the judge altered Wilson's total sentence to 12 months imprisonment, suspended for two years, but kept the sentence for sexual activity with a child the same, at eight months suspended for two years.

Wilson still faces having his sentence reviewed after Attorney General Dominic Grieve agreed to examine the case.

National

United States 'disappointed' by McKinnon decision

The United States has expressed its disappointment in the decision taken by the CPS not to prosecute Gary McKinnon. The US Embassy in London released a statement saying:

The United States was disappointed by the UK Home Secretary’s decision not to extradite Gary McKinnon, particularly in light of the UK courts’ and prior Home Secretaries’ decisions that he should face trial in the United States.

We note that the Home Secretary acknowledged the seriousness of the crimes of which Mr. McKinnon is accused, and described this case as exceptional, indicating that her decision does not set a precedent for future cases.

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Police and CPS explain McKinnon decision

The Director of Public Prosecutions and the Assistant Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service released a joint statement explaining their decision not to take further action against Gary McKinnon.

They identified a number of reasons why pursuing a prosecution would not be in the public interest:

  • Gary McKinnon is was originally supposed to be tried in the US; in October 2012, when the Home Secretary decided not to extradite him, there was no live criminal investigation against him in the UK, nor had there been for many years
  • As far as building a case against McKinnon in the UK was concerned, "the harm occurred in the US", the investigation was launched in the US, most of the witnesses are in the US and nearly all the physical evidence is in the US
  • US authorities, though willing to co-operate with a prosecution, would not agree transfer witnesses or evidence to the UK
  • The "prospect of a conviction in the UK which reflects the full extent of his alleged criminality are not high"

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'CPS have declared decision not to prosecute McKinnon'

The Crown Prosecution Service have declared their decision not to prosecute Gary McKinnon in the UK.

They state that the appropriate jurisdiction would be the United States, which is an interesting decision bearing in mind Mr McKinnon was originally arrested and interviewed by British police in 2002.

Mr McKinnon has always indicated that he would be willing to plead guilty to an offence under the Misuse of Computers Act but clearly cannot do so if he is not going to be prosecuted.

Mr McKinnon's legal team remains aware that his extradition warrant is still outstanding and will seek to explore other ways in which Mr McKinnon can receive complete closure on this long saga.

– Gary McKinnon's solicitors Kaim Todner
National

McKinnon won't face any further criminal action

Computer hacker Gary McKinnon will face no further criminal action, the Director of Public Prosecutions, Keir Starmer QC, has said.

The decision follows a review of the case after the Government's decision to block his extradition to the United States in October on health grounds.

Mr McKinnon, 46, from Wood Green, north London, would have faced up to 60 years in prison if convicted in the US.

Metropolitan Police Service and CPS issue statement on Operation Abelard

Following the withdrawal of the most recent trial into the murder of Daniel Morgan, the Metropolitan Police and CPS have issued their joint review commissioned in March last year.

The trial judge said this case was of an exceptional scale and complexity, with over three quarters of million documents gathered over 20 years being examined.

The issues around the disclosure exercise were such that we could not guarantee that all relevant material had been identified, considered and disclosed so as to ensure a fair trial. A further factor related to the unreliability of critical witnesses.

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