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Ages of children treated for drug misuse in London

  • Waltham Forest: 8-years-old
  • Brent, Barnet, Enfield, Haringey, Harrow, Wandsworth: 11-years-old
  • Barking and Dagenham, Camden, Hammersmith and Fulham, Hillingdon, Hounslow, Tower Hamlets: 12-years-old
  • Lambeth, Lewisham, Redbridge: 13-years-old
  • Croydon, Ealing, Kensington and Chelsea, Newham, Southwark: 14-years-old
  • Merton: 15-years-old
  • Kingston upon Thames, Richmond upon Thames: 17-years-old

Children vulnerable to drug misuse

Children as young as eight have been referred for specialist drug and alcohol treatment in Waltham Forest.

Charities are calling for improved drugs education in schools following an investigation by the Press Association that revealed the details.

Treatment experts said the most common reason for children to come into contact with drugs and alcohol is through their parents and preventative work is key to heading off misuse among youngsters.

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Suspected ecstasy death: 'First time he'd taken anything'

Speaking at the family home in Croydon, Daniel's father Tim described him as "a lovely mercurial kid".

He was up for adventure. He was a really normal kid. He spent a bunch of his spare time with his girlfriend and played a lot on his Xbox.

This was the first time he'd taken anything and if it could happen to him it could happen to anyone. We very much want to get that message across.

– Tim Spargo-Mabbs

Mr Spargo-Mabbs added that Daniel's girlfriend, who had gone to the same school as him, was "traumatised" by his death.

Young people buying drugs 'without a clue what's in them'

Police believe Daniel Spargo-Mabbs may have taken ecstasy before he fell unconscious and died. Drugs charity, DrugScope, says some young people are still taking too many risks, without understanding the consequences.

It certainly underlines the risks that young people are continuing to take after all these years with ecstasy and club drugs, maybe from people they don't know.

Buying drugs and not having a clue what's in them. It also underlines the randomness of this. Many people will experiment with ecstasy.

There would be no way of predicting who would end up in hospital.

– Harry Shapiro, DrugScope
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