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Hacking list not shared with Met until last week

The MetropolitanPolice did not see a controversial list of dozens of firms and individualslinked to rogue private investigators until last week, it was revealed today.

The list was compiled by the Serious Organised Crime Agency, which is coming under pressure from the House of Commons Home Affairs Committee to publish the names of those found to have used investigators to obtain private information.

Committee chairmanKeith Vaz said it was "very surprising" that the list was not sharedwith the Met, which is carrying out inquiries into allegations of phone-hacking, illicit payments to public officialsand computer-hacking by journalists, some linked to private investigators.

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Surrey Police 'should have investigated Dowler hacking'

After the IPCC concluded there was no case to answer for misconduct, Surrey Police say they have taken the following actions over the two officers being investigated:

  • In respect to the actions of Craig Denholm in 2002, the Chief Constable has taken management action and issued words of advice in relation to not assessing some of the material sent to him referring to phone-hacking.
  • In respect to the actions of Maria Woodall in 2007, the Chief Constable has taken management action and given words of advice in relation to not making the connection between the convictions for phone-hacking in 2007 and the events of 2002.

Surrey Police acknowledged in 2011 that the hacking of Milly Dowler's voicemails should have been investigated and both the former Chief Constable and I have met with and apologised to the Dowler family for the distress this has caused.

This was the largest and most high-profile murder investigation in the country at the time and remains the largest enquiry ever undertaken by Surrey Police. It was right that Milly was the primary focus of the investigation but the matter of phone-hacking should have been revisited at a later stage.

– Chief Constable Lynne Owens

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'No doubt' police knew of NOTW hacking

In the report the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) said:

"There is no doubt, from our investigation and the evidence gathered by Operation Baronet, that Surrey Police knew in 2002 of the allegation that Milly Dowler’s phone had been hacked by the News of the World (NOTW).

"It is apparent from the evidence that there was knowledge of this at all levels within the investigation team.

The report from the IPCC Credit: IPCC

"There is equally no doubt that Surrey Police did nothing to investigate it; nobody was arrested or charged in relation to the alleged interception of those messages either in 2002 or subsequently, until the Operation Weeting arrests in 2011."

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Warnings for officers after Milly hacking inquiry

Two police officers have been given "words of advice" after an Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) investigation in to their actions when the News of the World hacked Milly Dowler's mobile phone messages in 2002.

Surrey Police Deputy Chief Constable Craig Denholm and Detective Superintendent Maria Woodall will be given verbal and written warnings.

The News of the World listened to messages on Milly Dowler's phone after her disappearance. Credit: Surrey Police/PA

The pair were referred to the IPCC in November 2012, over accusations that Deputy Chief Constable Denholm knew Milly's phone was being accessed by the News of the World and that Detective Superintendent Woodall over information she provided Surrey Police during an internal investigation.

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Labour MP felt 'very uneasy' after Sun phone hacking

Labour MP Siobhain McDonagh has given her reaction to accepting "very substantial" damages and a public apology from The Sun after her stolen mobile phone was accessed by the newspaper.

I'm in public life and I don't have a hang-up about my own privacy, but my family and constituents who had contacted me and given personal views were subjected to people seeing it. That made me feel very uneasy.

As an MP, people tell me all sorts of things, people give their personal information and they believe that you will do the right thing with it. That wasn't for anyone's eyes.

I was a government whip, I had lots of phone numbers and had then exposed all those people to having their privacy invaded, and that troubled me.

– Siobhain McDonagh
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Labour MP calls for The Sun editor Mohan to be sacked

Labour MP Chris Bryant has called for The Sun editor Dominic Mohan to be sacked after the newspaper admitted accessing information from the stolen phone of his party colleague Siobhain McDonagh.

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The Sun admits 'serious misuse' of MP's phone info

The court heard information was accessed on the MP's phone after it was stolen from her car in October 2010. Credit: Katie Collins/PA

In paying Siobhain McDonagh very substantial damages, The Sun accepted information on her stolen mobile phone should not have been accessed and used.

A QC told the High Court on behalf of the newspaper it was a serious misuse of private information.

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