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Read All About It! British Library opens newspaper archive

Three centuries of archived newspapers will now become accessible to researchers as the British Library opens its own Newsroom. More than thirty million pounds has been spent to move the historic collection to a purpose built storage facility.

The British Library's Newsroom archive documents three centuries of the newsprint industry in this country. Credit: ITN

Watch and bible owned by Kray twins up for auction.

Watch owned by Kray twins. Credit: JP Humbert Auctioneers/PA Wire

Two items belonging to the infamous gangsters the Kray twins will go under the hammer at auction next week. A wristwatch and a bible previously owned by Ronnie Kray and later passed to Reggie Kray are expected to fetch hundreds of pounds.

The bible includes three bookmarks which have been left in their original places. Also up for auction is a painting by one of the UK's most notorious prisioners Charles Bronson which was given to Reggie while in jail.

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Real-time Jack the Ripper tweets show what life was like 125 years ago

Life in Victorian London during Jack the Ripper's 'Autumn of Terror' is brought to life on Twitter.

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Thank you for following the Whitechapel Real Time campaign. Welcome to Victorian London, 1888…

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#Constable Whitechapel criminals respect the uniform or they meet the end of my baton

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#OldBailey Landlady says Tabram 'would rather have a glass of ale than a cup of tea'; partner says lived happily 'until she took to drink.'

Ripper on Twitter: Tweets reveal what life was like

Jack the Ripper Cover of the Police News
Jack the Ripper Cover of the Police News - 17th November 1888. Credit: PA / PA/Tophams/Topham Picturepoint/Press Association Images

Jack the Ripper historians are pooling their knowledge into a Twitter feed which launched today.

They hope to show what Twitter might have looked like if it was around when the notorious killer stalked the streets of Whitechapel, 125 years ago.

It will include tweets from imagined detectives, reporters and local workers.

The project can be followed @WChapelRealTime

Impersonation
The signature on a letter dated 29 October 1888 written by a person claiming to be Jack the Ripper. Credit: Fiona Hanson/PA Archive/Press Association Images

Carnaby Street, Piccadilly Circus, the Hippodrome...

West India Docks c.1900, Hertsmere Road © Museum of London Credit: PLA collection/Museum of London

The West India Docks of East London in 1900, with North Quay viewed from the warehouse, which is now the site of Hertsmere Road.

Carnaby Street: 1968 Credit: Henry Grant Collection/Museum of London

During the 'swinging 60s', Carnaby Street boasted many fashionable boutiques including John Stephen (right).

Stephen opened his first shop in 1963 and went on to ownnine more in Carnaby Street alone. Lord John was owned by Warren and DavidGold, and Lady Jane (left) by Harry Fox.

View of Piccadilly Circus: 1927 Credit: Museum of London

View of Piccadilly Circus. George Davison Reid photographed this view towards Coventry Street from Piccadilly Circus. Beneath him, work was under way to construct the sub-surface station booking hall, escalators and pedestrian subways that were transforming Piccadilly Circus Underground station.

In 1923, an electric billboard was added to the facade of the London Pavilion theatre, to advertise the current performance. The theatre became a cinema seven years after this photo was taken.

London Hippodrome on Cranbourn Street: 20th century Credit: Museum of London

The popular London Hippodrome on Cranbourn Street, originally home to circus and variety, staged spectacular musical comedies and revues. The building had around 1,340 seats.

The performance advertised here in George Davison Reid's photo is for 'Son's O Guns', which opened at the Hippodrome on 26 June 1930.

Construction site to the west of Waterloo Bridge: 1866-1870 Credit: Museum of London

Construction site to the west of Waterloo Bridge and the foot of Savoy Street. The Victoria Embankment and the Metropolitan District Line were constructed simultaneously in 1868.

Part of the series of 64 photographs documenting the construction of the Metropolitan District Railway from Paddington to Blackfriars via Kensington, Westminster and the Victoria Embankment.

Bankside Power Station; 1952 Credit: Henry Grant Collection/Museum of London

Bankside Power station under construction in 1952. There was much opposition to the building which was designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott. The height of the chimney was limited to 200m so that it did not stand taller than the spire of St Paul’s cathedral.

Construction was completed in two phases (the Western side can be seen completed in this photograph) and although it started producing energy in late 1952 the building was not completed until 1963.

The power station closed in 1981 and the building has been home to the Tate Modern art gallery since 1995.

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The frozen Thames in 1677

Covent Garden Flower Women: c.1877 Credit: Museum of London

Three women selling flowers on the street in Convent Garden. The image is taken from a series of 37 photographs published in the book, 'Street Life in London'(1877), with text written by John Thomson and the journalist Adolphe Smith.

After taking photographs in the Far East, Thomson opened a portrait studio in London in 1875. Two years later he collaborated with the journalist, Adolphe Smith, to produce 'Street Life in London'.

The book was conceived as a follow-up to Henry Mayhew's famous study, 'London Labour and the London Poor' (1861–2). The photographs were used to guarantee the book's authenticity.

People queue at a music festival, Hyde Park: 1970 Credit: Henry Grant Collection/Museum of London

People queue at a music festival, Hyde Park. These people are queuing for food and drink or toilet facilities at a music concert in Hyde Park. Free summer music concerts had been held in Hyde Park since 1968.

Huge crowds enjoyed the atmosphere and popular music here in 1970.Musicians including Roy Harper, the Edgar Broughton Band and the headline band Pink Floyd played to crowds reportedly over 100,000 strong.

The Frozen Thames, looking Eastwards towards Old London Bridge: 1677 Credit: Museum of London

The Frozen Thames, looking Eastwards towards Old London Bridge. Oil on canvas. Numerous figures shown amusing themselves on the frozen river, skating, sliding, snowballing and even shooting.

Old London Bridge in in the middle distance and beyond it is the tower of St. Olave's Tooley Street and Southwark Cathedral.

View of Cheapside: c.1926 Credit: Museum of London

From opposite Old Change, running from Cheapside, George Davison Reid took this photo looking towards St Augustine's church. Around a decade after this photo was taken, Cheapside and the City of London were heavily damaged in the Blitz.

The street was lost as was the church, though its tower remains.

Shoe shine Piccadilly: 1953 Credit: Henry Grant Collection/Museum of London

Asoldier gets a shoe shine outside Piccadilly underground station.

West India Docks 1900: Sugar being hoisted into warehouses Credit: PLA collection/Museum of London

Sugar being hoisted into warehouses, West India Docks, east London.

Bomb damage at Bank station and Pankhurst arrested

The images were inspired by the award-winning, free StreetMuseumapp, which guides users to over 200 sites across London, where hidden histories ofthe city dramatically appear. History lovers can use their apple and android devices and see the past emerge through the present scene.

The original photos and paintings can be enjoyed at the Museum of London.

Bomb damage at the Bank Underground Station: 1941 Credit: Museum of London/By Kind Permission of The Commissioner of the City of London Police

During a night raid of the Blitz on London on January 10th, 1941, Bank Underground station sustained a direct hit. A high-explosive bomb exploded in the escalator machinery room, causing widespread destruction.

Some of the estimated 111 dead, who had been sheltering in the tube, were thrown into the path of an incoming train.

Police Constables Arthur Cross and Fred Tibbs photographed the aftermath. The crater that formed outside the Royal Exchange through the impact of the bomb was so wide and deep that Royal Engineers had to build a bridge across it.

Anti-Union Movement protestors, Trafalgar Square: 1962 Credit: Henry Grant Collection/Museum of London

Oswald Mosley and the Union Movement attempted to stage a rally in Trafalgar Square.There was furious opposition from thousands in the crowds who were angry that such a rally was allowed to take place.

Chanted slogans included 'Down with fascism!', 'Down with Mosley!' and 'Get off the platform!'. Amongst the protestors were 1,000 people, led by the Reverend Bill Sargent of Dalston, who wore the yellow Star of David in memory of the Jewish Holocaust.

Bomb Damage at number 21 Queen Victoria street: 1941 Credit: Museum of London/By Kind Permission of The Commissioner of the City of London Police

The collapsing front of Nos. 23 & 25 Queen Victoria Street, caused by the German bombing raid on the City of London on the night of 10th May 1941. The night raid of 10 May 1941 was the most severe attack London had sustained throughout the Blitz.

Emmeline Pankhurst being arrested while trying to present a petition to the King: 1914 Credit: Museum of London

Emmeline Pankhurst being arrested while trying to present a petition to the King at Buckingham Palace, 21 May 1914. As she was being carried past a group of reporters Emmeline called out 'Arrested at the gates of the Palace. Tell the King'.

She was then lifted in to a waiting car and driven straight to Holloway prison. The arresting officer, Superintendent Rolfe, died two weeks later of heart failure.

Pompeii exhibition coming to British Museum

The British Museum Credit: PA

For the first time in 40 years, parts of the preserved cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum are coming to London in a new exhibition at the British Museum.

Over 450 objects are going on display, many of which haven't been seen outside Italy.

The thing that makes Pompeii so famous are the casts of people. Credit: PA

Pompeii and Herculaneum were the ill-fated cities on the Bay of Naples in southern Italy which were buried by the catastrophic volcanic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD.

As both cities were unprepared for the event, the daily life of its citizens were preserved until they were discovered nearly 1700 years later.

"Life and Death in Pompeii and Herculaneum" runs at the British Museum from 28 March to 29 September.

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