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London North West A&E waiting times 'worst in England'

Northwick Park hospital in Harrow Credit: PA

London North West NHS Trust had the country's worst waiting times for two weeks running in October. More than 3,500 patients had to wait for more than four hours to be seen.

According to an analysis of NHS data by London Assembly Labour Group Health Spokesperson, Dr Onkar Sahota AM, the system is 'breaking under the strain' since the closures of Hammersmith and Central Middlesex A&Es two months ago.

Charity to offer vital homeless aftercare

For the thousands of people who sleep rough in London hospitals are often the only place to go for help.

Life expectancy for a man sleeping rough is 30 years lower than the average.

Now a charity is launching a special service to offer the vital aftercare needed when people are discharged from hospitals. Ria Chatterjee went to see it in action.

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Hospital aftercare for the homeless launches

A scheme to provide aftercare for homeless people after they have been discharged from hospital is launched today. St Mungo’s has been given £3.6 million of a £10 million boost from the Department of Health for the new scheme.

Homeless people are often discharged back onto the street after hospital treatment with a third getting help with their living situation. This fails to deal with underlying health issues. St Mungo's will now launch an aftercare network for homeless people.

London A&Es failing Government targets

More than half of the capitals major A&Es failed to meet the Government's four-hour waiting time target.

Six London trusts missed the target at least 80 per cent of the time over the last year, while Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals Trust missed it every single week.

The London Assembly's Health Committee, which carried out the study, warns that waiting times could get worse this winter as demand for care increases.

Mother of toddler 'unconvinced over shared care'

The parents of a toddler who died after doctors in London failed to sport her fatal brain condition claim that a catalogue of chances to act on their daughter's chances were missed.

Two-year-old Alice Mason had successfully undergone treatment for a brain tumour two months before she was taken ill in March 2011. She died days later, having developed fluid on the brain, an inquest heard. On Thursday the child's mother, Rosalind Mason told the inquest:

I'm still not convinced that shared care is a safe option for providing care to very sick children, and I'm afraid our experience of even trying to learn the truth about our daughter has been hugely complicated.

We have found that going through the reports they have written in answer to our questions has been very lengthy, and we have not agreed with many of the things they have written, and asked them to correct them. It's saddening that this situation is in place.

Mother launches attack on hospital over toddler death

The mother of a toddler who died after doctors in London failed to spot her fatal brain condition in time to save her has launched an attack on "shared care" between hospitals.

Two-year-old Alice Mason had successfully undergone treatment for a brain tumour two months before she was taken ill in March 2011.

She died days later, having developed fluid on the brain, an inquest at West London Coroner's Court has heard.

The youngster's care was shared between her family's local district general hospital, Kingston Hospital in Surrey, cancer specialists at the Royal Marsden Hospital, in Chelsea, west London, and a neurosurgical team at St George's Hospital, south London.

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Medical council raises 'serious concerns' over hospital

The General Medical Council has said it had generally found "good" levels of tuition over a three-month period across the capital's five medical schools and 10 university hospitals, after a report revealed that Charing Cross hospital had used operating theatres were turned into makeshift wards.

The GMC praised the following hospitals:

  • Croydon University Hospital as “outstanding”
  • St George’s University of London “much to be positive”
  • Royal Free in Hampstead “highly committed to education”

The GMC raised concerns about:

  • Northwick Park hospital in Harrow had “significant patient safety concerns”.

NHS Trust: Overcrowding shows 'working to full capacity'

The use of operating theatres to ventilate patients at Charing Cross hospital is a "symptom of a healthcare system working close to full capacity", a new report has shown.

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, which runs Charing Cross, said patients would occasionally be kept in operating theatres as this was considered better than transferring them to an intensive care unit at another hospital. A spokesman:

This would be a temporary measure that enabled us to provide the safest possible care until a bed in the ICU became available.

This situation has now changed and patients taken from theatre to intensive care will be nursed by the doctor if specialist nurses are not available.

Inspectors find hospital theatres turned into wards

A London hospital was so overcrowded that operating theatres were turned into makeshift wards, says report.

A London hospital was so overcrowded that operating theatres were turned into makeshift wards, according to a new report.

Charing Cross hospital used the theatres when it ran out of critical care beds - with doctors caring for seriously ill patients because there were no nurses available.

This prevented the theatres being used for emergency surgery and “provided a poor and potentially distressing environment” for visiting friends and family, the General Medical Council said.

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