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  1. National

Theresa May criticised by Tory colleague over Qatada

Mark Reckless says the European Court has moved the goalposts over Qatada. Credit: ITV News

Conservative MP Mark Reckless has criticised Theresa May’s legal strategy over the attempted deportation of Abu Qatada – but added that she has one more chance to succeed.

He said: “The Home Secretary has pursued throughout the wrong legal strategy, she’s got one last chance and what she needs to do is to put the key constitutional questions to the Supreme Court – who has the last word, Strasbourg or the Supreme Court?

"If she does that, I think she can still win.”

The Court of Appeal turned down May’s attempt to take to the Supreme Court her fight to have Qatada deported and she will now appeal directly to the highest court in the country.

Reckless added: “There is a real chance but she needs a proper point of law to argue…

“She needs to make this big constitutional argument because we can win that.”

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Yvette Cooper condemns efforts to deport Qatada

Yvette Cooper says there is a risk Abu Qatada will return to the streets. Credit: Stefan Rousseau/PA Archive/Press Association Images

Shadow Home Secretary Yvette Cooper has criticised Theresa May's efforts to deport Abu Qatada, saying her strategy has "completely failed".

She said: “A year ago Theresa May promised Abu Qatada would soon be on a plane. Now it is clear her legal strategy has completely failed...

“Theresa May failed to appeal against the European Court decision last year. It is no good the Home Secretary blaming the Court when she didn't appeal when she had the chance."

  1. National

What next for the government over Abu Qatada?

The Home Office said it was 'disappointed' by the Court of Appeal's decision. Credit: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire

The Government has been refused permission to take its fight to remove preacher Abu Qatada from the UK to the Supreme Court, but the affair is not at an end.

The Home Office will now request permission to appeal directly to the Supreme Court.

Three Supreme Court justices are expected to consider that appeal, which is set to be presented on paper rather than in the form of a full hearing.

The decision could be overturned if the justices are convinced there is a "point of law of general public importance".

  1. National

Home Office 'disappointed' with latest Qatada ruling

The Government could still apply directly to the Supreme Court in a bid to take the case further.

The normal process is to submit a permission to appeal application which would then be considered by three Supreme Court justices.

They would decide whether or not the application raised a point of law of general public importance.

We are disappointed with the Court of Appeal's decision but will now request permission to appeal directly from the Supreme Court.

The Government remains committed to deporting this dangerous man and we continue to work with the Jordanians to address the outstanding legal issues preventing deportation.

– Home Office spokesperson
  1. National

Home Office challenge: Qatada is 'truly dangerous'

At the Court of Appeal, lawyers for Home Secretary Theresa May had challenged a ruling made last November by immigration judges on the grounds that Qatada was a "truly dangerous" individual who had escaped deportation through "errors of law".

But three appeal judges said the Special Immigration Appeals Commission (Siac) was entitled to conclude that disputed statements will be used against Qatada.

Theresa May has continued in her efforts to deport Abu Qatada. Credit: PA/PA Wire

Qatada, who featured in hate sermons found on videos in the flat of one of the 9/11 bombers, has ultimately thwarted every attempt by the Government to put him on a plane.A resident in the UK since September 1993, he was returned to jail last month after he was arrested for alleged bail breaches.

A hearing over whether he should be granted bail again was due to be held last month, but was delayed.

Police searched Qatada's family home in London before he was held and have since said that he is being investigated over extremist material.

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Home Secretary's plan for Abu Qatada 'ripped apart'

This is an extremely serious and disappointing judgment which rips apart Theresa May's strategy for deporting Abu Qatada and contradicts her repeated assurances to Parliament that her approach would get him swiftly on to a plane.

According to security experts, the Home Secretary and the courts, this is an extremely dangerous man, and we all want him to be deported to stand fair trial abroad as soon as possible and to be held in custody in the meantime.

– Yvette Cooper, Shadow home secretary
  1. National

Risk of 'flagrant denial of justice' in Abu Qatada case

Appeal Judges upheld a decision made in November by the Special Immigration Appeals Commission (SIAC):

SIAC was entitled to conclude that there is a real risk that the impugned statements will be admitted in evidence at a retrial and that, in consequence, there is a real risk of a flagrant denial of justice.

Lord Dyson, Lord Justice Richards and Lord Justice Elias said the court accepted that Qatada "is regarded as a very dangerous person", but that was not "a relevant consideration" under human rights laws.

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