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  1. National

Twitter updates rules and pledges to add safety staff

Twitter has issued a new set of commitments after a spate of high-profile allegations of threats and abuse because, it says, "people deserve to feel safe" using the network.

In a blog post written by Del Harvey, Twitter's San Francisco-based head of safety and Tony Wang, Twitter UK's general manager, the service committed to:

  • Update its rules to be clearer on abuse and threats
  • Add an 'in-Tweet report button' to the Android application and Twitter.com (it has already been introduced on mobile web Twitter and on the iPhone app)
  • Work with the UK Safer Internet Centre and include its campaigns in promoted trends
  • Add more staff to its teams that handle abuse reports

The pledges come in response to a series of threats and abuse allegations in recent weeks:

  1. National

Police investigate Twitter abuse claims by eight people

Police have revealed they are investigating allegations by eight people over abuse received on social networking site Twitter.

The Met said its e-crime unit was looking into the claims, three of which are incidents outside of London.

Police investigate Twitter abuse allegations of eight people.

The force said: "Whilst outside PCeU's cyber operational remit, the MPS has taken the decision to centralise the individual investigations, including three that are outside London, to make the most effective use of resources avoid duplication by separate."

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Maintaining digital record 'priceless'

Legal deposit arrangements remain vitally important.

Preserving and maintaining a record of everything that has been published provides a priceless resource for the researchers of today and the future.

So it's right that these long-standing arrangements have now been brought up to date for the 21st century, covering the UK's digital publications for the first time.

– Ed Vaizey, Culture Minister

"There was a danger we'd lose our digital heritage"

Ten years ago, there was a very real danger of a black hole opening up and swallowing our digital heritage, with millions of web pages, e-publications and other non-print items falling through the cracks of a system that was devised primarily to capture ink and paper.

The regulations now coming into force make digital legal deposit a reality, and ensure that the Legal Deposit Libraries themselves are able to evolve - collecting, preserving and providing long-term access to the profusion of cultural and intellectual content appearing online or in other digital formats.

– Roly Keating, chief executive of the British Library

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British Library to archive web

Regulations come into force at midnight tonight, which allow the British Library to begin archiving the entire UK web domain.

Billions of webpages, blogs and e-books will also be preserved in order to document the digital age.

The library could eventually collect copies of every public Tweet or Facebook page in the British web domain.

The British Library will soon be able to archive websites Credit: PA
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