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Rare lapwing chicks born at London Wetland Centre

Five broods of lapwing chicks have hatched at the 105 acre WWT London Wetland Centre in Barnes.The lapwings were once a familiar farm bird but have seen numbers decline significantly and are now on the RSPB’s Red List for endangered species.

A lapwing chick out for a stroll. Credit: Mike Caiden

One female has three chicks. In the chilly weather we’re having at the moment, they huddle under her, using their mother as a lapwing radiator.

The chicks gather for warmth under their mother... Credit: Mike Caiden

This is normal behaviour for lapwings, although sometimes it can be a bit of a struggle to find space among all the legs as this bemused looking chick discovered.

...though one chick found it hard to squeeze in. Credit: Mike Caiden

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New family of otters arrive in London

London Wetland Centre has seen the arrival of a family of otters.

From 2 June visitors to WWT London Wetland Centre will be able to see a family of four Asian short-clawed otters playing, foraging, feeding, swimming and grooming.

Visitors can even watch them sleeping in their specially designed holt, although this species of otter is more active during the day than some of the 13 other species found worldwide. Asian short-clawed otters are the smallest otters in the world.

New family of otters at London Wetland Centre

Asian short-clawed otters are listed as a vulnerable species because of pollution, habitat loss and hunting. Credit: Alan Hewitt, Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust

A family of four Asian short-clawed otters has arrived at the London Wetland Centre in Barnes.

From next month, visitors will be able to watch them playing, foraging, feeding, swimming and even sleeping in their specially designed holt.

Asian short-clawed otters are the smallest species of otter in the world. Unlike most others - which tend to be solitary - they live together in family groups.