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Rare snails to be released by London Zoo

Hundreds of tiny endangered tree-snails will be reintroduced to their former Polynesian home following the incredible success of an international breeding programme led by ZSL London Zoo.

Three species of Partula snail, Partula affinis, Partula nodosa, and Partula hyalina, which were bred at ZSL London Zoo and other partner zoos around the world, will be released on to the island of Tahiti in October after a nearly 30 year absence.

ZSL London Zoo invertebrate keeper and coordinator of the international Partula studbook, Don McFarlane, along with staff from Bristol and Edinburgh Zoos, will be escorting the precious cargo of snails to Tahiti, where they will be released into a protected reserve in their native forest habitat.

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Breathtaking winning photographs on display at London Zoo

Category Six - Deep and Meaningful. Adult Winner. SLOWEST SPRINTER by Vaclav Krpelik. Credit: Vaclav Krpelik (c) ZSL

A stunning shot of a turtle gliding through the sea and the breathtaking image of an ant carrying a leaf ten times its size.

That's just two of the mesmerising pictures entered into the ZSL Animal Photography Prize now showing at London Zoo.

The competition is held every year to inspire amateur and professional photographers to get out and capture the magic of the natural world.

Category Four - Size Matters. Adult Winner. A GIANT TROPHY FOR A SMALL ANT by Bence Mate. Credit: Bence Mate (c) ZSL
Adult Highly Commended. FAIRY TERN HOVER by Michael Gallagher. Credit: Michael Gallagher (c) ZSL

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Vital statistics at London Zoo

The measurements taken during London zoo's annual stock-take are used to monitor the animals' health and shared with zoos across the world to compare information on endangered species.

"Every year we like to weigh the animals we have at the zoo, really just for a record so we can share it with other zoos and even conservation projects abroad."Not everything can be weighed, but anything that we have that can be trained, from camels to birds, aadvarks to armadillos - even the tigers - we are trying to get weighed today."By being able to tell what they weigh, we can use that later on if they're not very well - if they've lost weight we know that they're sick, if they're pregnant their weights will go up, so throughout the year we can use it as a comparative."

– Zookeeper Angela Ryan
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