Met Police specialists sent to Ukraine

Experts from New Scotland Yard are traveling to Ukraine to help recover the bodies of the victims of the Malaysia Airlines plane crash.

Live updates

National

Police 'spying' news like 'a bomb exploding in my head'

The mother of a 20-year-old student who died in mysterious circumstances in 1997 has told ITV News that being told a secret police unit was keeping information on her was like "a bomb exploding in my head".

Ricky Reel was with his friends on a night out before they were all racially abused by two white men.

The student disappeared shortly after that incident and his body was later found in the River Thames.

Today's report found that a secret police unit kept information on families of 17 justice campaigns.

In response to the findings, Ricky's mother Sukhdev Reel told ITV News: "Please spy on criminals, what crime did I commit?"

National

Police unit 'spying' on justice campaigns 'distressing'

The Chief Constable who led the report that found a secret Scotland Yard unit held information on families of 17 justice campaigns admitted it would be "distressing" for relatives to learn that their details were being held.

Scotland Yard held information on families of 17 justice campaigns.
Scotland Yard held information on families of 17 justice campaigns. Credit: Eye Ubiquitous

Mick Creedon, Derbyshire Chief Constable, added that it "must seem inexplicable" for the families who have had their details held by the force.

One reference in the report was to an unnamed individual planning to go to a funeral, even though "there was no intelligence to indicate that the funeral would have been anything other than a dignified event".

Mr Creedon said: "Unless the information could have prevented crime or disorder it should not have been retained."

Despite the report finding no evidence that covert operations targeted grieving families, the fact information that had no relevance in preventing crimes was kept, was heavily criticised.

Advertisement

National

Justice campaign families to be 'informed' on 'spying'

Families of 17 justice campaigns - for murder victims or those who died following police contact - will be informed on what information Scotland Yard held about them.

Derbyshire Chief Constable Mick Creedon, who led the inquiry, said:

Operation Herne has identified emerging evidence that in addition to the Stephen Lawrence Campaign, a number of other justice campagins have been mentioned within SDS records. Seventeen such justice campaigns have been identified so far.

These range between 1970 and 2005, and are as a result of deaths in police custdoy, following police contact and the victims of murders.

It is the intention of Chief Constable Creedon and Operation Herne to inform all of the families involved and share, where possible, the knowledge and information held.

– Derbyshire Chief Constable Mick Creedon
National

De Menezes family 'distressed' by spying claims

Accusations that Scotland Yard officers spied on the family of Jean Charles de Menezes has "exacerbated" the distress felt by the Brazilian's relatives - who were mourning the anniversary of his shooting yesterday.

It is shameful that the Metropolitan Police spied on the legitimate campaign activities of a grieving family who were simply trying to get the answers they deserved after their loved one was killed by police officers.

It begs the question - what exactly were the police spying for? We can only assume they were gathering information in an attempt to discredit the family's campaign for justice in order to deflect accountability for their own failings.

Hearing the news just one day after the anniversary of the shooting exacerbates the family's distress at a time when they are remembering Jean Charles and what he meant to them - a loving, caring 27-year-old, shot down in the prime of his life.

– A spokeswoman for the Jean Charles De Menezes Family Campaign
National

Claims Scotland Yard spied on de Menezes family

The family of Jean Charles de Menezes - who was shot dead by officers who mistook him for a suicide bomber in 2005 - are considering legal action against Scotland Yard after it was claimed the force spied on them.

Jean Charles de Menezes was shot dead by police in July 2005.
Jean Charles de Menezes was shot dead by police in July 2005. Credit: PA / Family Handout

Scotland Yard is embroiled in a fresh scandal after claims officers gathered information about several grieving families involved in justice groups, including relatives of Mr de Menezes.

It is also alleged the force collected data on relatives of Cherry Groce, whose death sparked the Brixton riots, and Ricky Reel who died in mysterious circumstances in 1997.

The latest report on the force's secretive Special Demonstration Squad (SDS) will be published today. The unit, Special Branch and senior management at the Metropolitan Police are set for criticism.

Derbyshire Chief Constable Mick Creedon, who is leading the inquiry, will say that rules were flouted over what information should have been kept on record.

National

Met 'collected data which didn't help prevent crime'

The senior management of Scotland Yard moles showed a "lack of regard" for the rules after collecting information on groups "which served no purpose in preventing crime", a report has found.

My report is very clear that criticism must be levelled at the Metropolitan Police Service for keeping information, which had been gathered by undercover officers, which served no purpose in preventing crime or disorder.

This is not a criticism of the deployment of the individual officers, but of the lack of regard the SDS, Special Branch and the Metropolitan Police Service senior management paid to the rules and legislation that clearly set out what they should, and should not have, collected and retained.

– Derbyshire Chief Constable Mick Creedon

However, Mr Creedon said there was no evidence to suggest that officers deliberately targeted black justice groups that pressed for action following police shootings, deaths in police custody and serious racist assaults.

Advertisement

Increases in child rape cases leaving Met 'under serious strain'

Child crying
The increase in reports of child abuse has left the Met under Credit: CLAUDIO BRESCIANI / SCANPIX/TT News Agency/Press Association Images

Huge increases in allegations of rape and sexual assault against children is stretching police resources in London. There has been a rise of more than a third in reports in the last five years. The London Assembly has warned that the increase coupled with a lack of staff has left the Met under "serious strain."

From 2009-10 to 2013-14 the number of alleged child rapes and sexual assaults against children rose by 34%. In the last year alone allegations of these serious offenses rose by well over 10% according to figures released by the London Assembly.

Police warned over Taser use

Police have been warned over the use of Tasers. The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) said they should not be used as a first response. Figures show Tasers were used more than 2,000 times in London last year. The IPCC urged forces across the UK not to use Tasers as a default if other options are available.

Police warned over Taser use
Police warned over Taser use. Credit: Gareth Fuller/PA Wire

Metropolitan Police diversity to be examined

Diversity in the Metropolitan Police is being examined today with a focus on policewomen on the front-line. The Police and Crime Committee is aiming to see if the Met is achieving the Mayor's goal of a force that 'reflects the city it serves.'

Male and female police officers.
Diversity in the Metropolitan Police is being examined today with a focus on policewomen on the frontline. Credit: ITV News London
Load more updates

Advertisement

Today's top stories