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How a maximum rise of 6.1% would affect key routes

Here are some of the key rail routes into London, and how a maximum rise of 6.1% would affect prices (if imposed):

  • Brighton to Victoria: Currently £3,532, 6.1% rise = £3,747
  • Reading to Paddington: Currently £3,960.00, 6.1% rise = £4,201
  • Guildford to Waterloo: Currently £3224.00, 6.1% rise = £3,420
  • St Albans to Thameslink: Currently £3,112.00, 6.1% rise = £3,301
  • Shenfield to Liverpool Street: Currently £2704.00, 6.1% rise = £2,968
  • Southend Victoria to Liverpool Street: Currently £3452.00, 6.1% rise = £3,662
  • Bedford to Thameslink: Currently £4172, 6.1% rise = £4,426
  • Basingstoke to London terminals: Currently £3952, 6.1% rise = £4,193
  • East Croydon to Waterloo: Currently £1,572.00, 6.1% rise = £1,667
National

RMT: 'Nobody will be fooled by this political stunt'

General Secretary of the Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers Union Bob Crow. Credit: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

Bob Crow, leader of the RMT transport union, has said that the announcement that rail fare increases are to be capped next year is a "total con".

Regulated fares in England could have gone up by 9.1% in January but they will now be a maximum of 6.1%.

"This is a total con that will still leave the vast majority paying inflation-busting fares to pump up the profits of the private train operators.

"For a few it will feel like having your wallet nicked with the mugger then handing you a few bob back to buy a pint. Nobody will be fooled by this political stunt.

Read: How the increase in rail fares will be restricted

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How the increase in rail fares will be restricted

  • The average rise of regulated fares in maintained at 1% above RPI inflation
  • The new year rise is based on the July 2013 RPI inflation rate, which was 3.2%
  • The Government announced that the ability of train operators to add an additional 5% to some individual fares is to be limited to just 2%
  • In January 2014, no regulated fare - which includes season tickets - can go up by no more than 6.2%
National

Rail customer watchdog welcomes fare increase cap

Anthony Smith, chief executive of rail customer watchdog Passenger Focus, has welcomed the cap on rail fare increases.

Rail customer watchdog Passenger Focus has welcomed the fare increase cap. Credit: Press Association

He said: "Passengers will be pleased to hear that the amount train companies can raise individual regulated fares by has been limited.

"We have been calling for this to happen for years - it is a step towards a fairer system. This will allow passengers to plan with a bit more certainty and have confidence that actual regulated fare rises will bear more relation to the figures set by government."

National

Government: Some commuters could save £200 a year

Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin says the planned cap on rail fare increases - which the Government says could have been as much as 9.2% -could save some commuters hundreds of pounds a year.

Today is just the start of a Government-wide programme to help hardworking people and reduce the cost of living. The Government will be announcing a range of initiatives to help put money back in people's pockets over the next few weeks.

By capping fares we are protecting passengers from large rises at a time when family incomes are already being squeezed. We will need to wait for the rail industry to calculate individual ticket prices for next year, but this cap could save some commuters as much as £200 a year.

– Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin
National

Rail fare increases to be capped in January 2014

Hard-pressed rail commuters facing inflation-busting season ticket fare increases in the new year are to be given some respite.

The Government has announced it is to cap the increases of regulated fares planned for January 2014.

The Government has announced a cap on rail fare increases. Credit: Press Association

It says the ability of train operators to add an additional five percent to some individual fares, as long as the average rise of regulated fares is maintained at one percent above RPI inflation, is being limited to just two percent.

This means that in January 2014, no regulated fare - which includes season tickets - can go up by more than 6.2%, with the average, as already announced, being limited to 4.2%.

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Fare Protests

Campaigners will gather at five London Tube and rail stations later this morning to protest against planned fare hikes and ticket office closures.

The Labour led demonstrations are taking place at Clapham South, Golders Green, Queen's Park, New Cross and East Croydon.

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Train companies defend fare decisions

The Association of Train Operating Companies (ATOC) has defended the way rail companies apply the fare rises that Government policy allows them. While rail fares can only go up by inflation plus 1% that is the average figure which is why some fares have risen by much more today.

Edward Welsh, ATOC spokesman told ITV News: "Just as they might increase them above 4.2% they have to de-crease them elsewhere.

"It's like a traditional pair of kitchen scales. The Government ensures that all the fares come back to 4.2%."

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