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Scientist's seventy year career honoured in exhibition

Scientist James Lovelock Credit: Nick Ansell/PA Wire

James Lovelock, the 94 year old scientist described as 'one of the most important independent scientists of the twentieth century', will see his work honoured in an exhibition opening today at the Science Museum.

The exhibition uncovers achievements from throughout his seventy year career, which saw him work on fields as diverse as medicine, space exploration an environmental science.

Science Museum aims to recreate CERN lab

The Nobel winning scientist who discovered the existence of the 'godparticle' will open a new exhibition at the Science Museum today.

Professor Peter Higgs will tour the new one million pound"Collider" exhibition - the most ambitious exhibition at the museum to date.

The exhibition will be devoted to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the giant atom smashing machine based at the CERN laboratory in Switzerland, which confirmed the particle's existence last year.

The Museum hopes to recreate what life is like at the particlephysics laboratory near Geneva.

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Child inventor wins Science Museum award

A portable foot shower designed by an 11-year-old from St Albans has won the Science Museum's summer invention competition.

Sophia Laycock's 'Pediclean' washes the sand off your feet when you've been on the beach.

She beat over 60 entries to win a 3D printer worth £2,000.

The device consists of a plastic bottle which attaches to a pipe and when squeezed, dispenses a spray of water onto the feet which are placed on a platform.

It's designed to be light-weight and easy to transport while on holiday.

Sophia said: "I'm really thrilled to win this competition. I've seen foot showers at beaches whilst on holiday, but never seen anything like that in Britain. The 'Pediclean' is just a simple way of cleaning sand off your feet so the sand stays at the beach and doesn't get in the car!"

Mark Champkins, Science Museum Inventor in Residence said: "This product is an ingenious solution to one of the most irritating problems experienced on a trip to the beach." The 'Pediclean' is a smart and simple design that I can imagine in the shops."

Science Museum to turn back hundreds of clocks

As you put the clocks back this weekend, spare a thought for the Science Museum as British Summer Time ends. The museum has to wind back around 500 clocks by 2am on Sunday. The change means darker evenings and an extra hour of daylight in the morning.

Horologist Francis Brodie checks one of the 500 working clocks in the Science Museum
Horologist Francis Brodie checks one of the 500 working clocks in the Science Museum Credit: PA Wire

Some MPs are still calling for an end to putting clocks back, calling it a "flawed ritual of plunging the UK into darkness by mid-afternoon".

A large section of the working exhibits needs changin this weekend Credit: PA Wire

Invent a solution to the British summertime

by Martin Stew
Mark Champkins is looking for creative young people to improve the British summer Credit: Martin Stew/ITV London

Tired of sandy sandwiches, pesky wasps and washout school holidays? The Science Museum wants children’s help to come up with inventive solutions to some of British summer’s greatest frustrations.

It’s launched a competition for 8-16 year olds to invent new and creative products that will help us deal with whatever the summer throws at us.

Can you solve a problem we face during the summer? Credit: Martin Stew/ITV London

Science Museum inventor in residence Mark Champkins says:

“Your invention should try to solve a problem we face during the summertimein Britain. Could a picnic hamper with a pop up umbrella to shield you from anunexpected rain shower help? Or a sunshade to stop your ice-cream melting inthe sun?

To get started, think about the places you visit when you’re holidaying in Britain and the problems you may face:

  • at the seaside

  • in the countryside

  • on a long car journey

  • in a caravan

  • at home in the garden

  • camping in a tent”

The winner will receive a 3D printer worth £2,000 and see their design created for a new exhibition. Entries have to be in by midnight on Sunday 25th August.

To apply click here

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The tea shop managers who played crucial part in computer revolution

Lyons Manager Alice Eleanor Bacon was one of the first to use a computer in the workplace Credit: Peter Bird

Managers of Lyon's Tea Shop who worked on the world's first computer to be used at work are being 'hunted' by the capital's Science Museum to form part of a £15.6 million multi-media display.

The display called Information Age will celebrate key developments in communication technologies over the past 200 years.

The Lyons Electronic Office (LEO I) was created by the J Lyons and Co catering company and used in Lyons tea shops in the 1950s, playing a crucial role in developing computers in the workplace.

The museum wants to celebrate this achievement with the memories of the tea shop managers who worked with LEO I.

The hunt for 1950's tea shop staff who pioneered computers at work

The search is on for tea shop staff who took part in a pioneering project that first brought computer technology into the workplace.

This is the world's first computer Lyons Electronic Office (LEO) and covered 5,000 sq ft Credit: Science Museum

Researchers at the Science Museum are trying to trace people who worked as managers in the Lyons Tea Houses during the 1950s when the firm introduced a basic form of computer.

The computer used was a 5,000 sq ft machine called The Lyons Electronic Office (LEO), the world's first.

It was introduced in 1951 and helped staff calculate how many cakes needed baking as well as tracking orders around the country.

Once the managers have been contacted museum staff want to include their experiences in a £15.6 million gallery called Information Age.

Will.i.am presents windfall to London's future scientists

An international singer songwriter and the Princes Trust came together today, to find the capital's future science stars.

The self-confessed techie Will.i.am, who's searching for the next Bill Gates, has brought that search to London, donating half a million pounds to create science workshops for schools at the Science Museum.

Rags Martel was there:

British Summer Time ends early at The Science Museum

British Summer Time comes to an end this weekend, but one London museum has so many clocks, it's already started the laborious process of resetting them all.

The Science Museum has a gallery containing 500 timepieces, from sand-glasses to sundials, dating back hundreds of years.

Richard Horton, Conservator at the Science Museum in London turns back one of 500 time pieces. Credit: Stefan Rousseau /PA
One down, 499 to go. Credit: Stefan Rousseau /PA
Some of the old clocks require specialist skills to turn them back. Credit: Stefan Rousseau /PA
The Measuring Time gallery showcases a range of devices from sand-glasses to sundials, water clocks to wristwatches. Credit: ITN
Senior curator Andrew Nahum says the time adjustments twice a year "represent an intriguing part of national life". Credit: ITN
British Summer Time ends on Sunday. Credit: Stefan Rousseau /PA

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